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Wellness Through Events

The Paw Print

Each week the Division of Student Affairs sends out The Paw Print, which will provide you with updates on key areas and events that you can engage in virtually. An archive of each week's announcement will be kept here

Look for the section of this newsletter called Physically Distant, Socially Connected where you will find weekly engagement opportunities to connect to your fellow Wildcats, Chicagoland, and the globe.
 
The division of student affairs is committed to maintaining current connections and establishing new ones as we remain physically apart. Although not in-person, we will continue to offer various programs for the community. You are invited to check your inbox for weekly engagement opportunities, and follow your favorite social media platforms for specific and departmental programs.
 
The Importance of Engaging for Your Wellness

Engaging in stimulating activities outside of the classroom is just as important to support your overall health and wellbeing as attending classes and studying for your exams. Northwestern provides an endless array of engaging events for little or no cost. These opportunities allow for connecting with new people and learning in a way you may not have otherwise.

Every event provides some way to foster an area of your wellbeing whether it’s a movie screening, speaker panel, sporting event, or even Dillo Day! Give yourself the time to enjoy these opportunities. It just may be what sends you on a new path you never could see before.

To see a full listing of Wellness events click here.

 

Sep
15
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
15
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
15
2022

Academic Directions Fair

9:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Open-house for First-year students. Check out the Department of Philosophy.

Sep
15
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Sep
15
2022

Recording Lectures Using Panopto

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview of fundamental Panopto features and demonstrates how to access and use Panopto through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to start recording their own videos or narrated presentations.

Sep
16
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
16
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
16
2022

Being Bipolar in a Polarized World - Art Exhibit

10:00 AM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

This exhibit created by Chicago artist Kelly Mathews, exemplifies how the personal is political within the context of art. Having been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder after years of destructive behavior, Mathews understands the meaning of the "edge" and often steps close to it when creating art, resulting in bold and fearless work. Her power lies in the purest form of honesty. There is no pretension or art speak. What we see is what she feels. Kelly Mathews is an artist from Chicago, IL.  She was born in small town Iowa where she pursued two things, art, and Arabian horses.  After receiving her BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute, Kelly spent the next 22 years professionally training and showing Arabian horses.  Her students have won numerous top National honors in the United States and Canada.  Retiring in 2014 from professional riding, Kelly has returned full time to her art. Her history with addiction, rehab, recovery and Bipolar disorder lend her a unique perspective on the world around her.  Primarily using encaustic and photography, her work deals with social and political issues and erasing the stigma of mental illnessKelly Mathews is an artist from Chicago, IL.  She was born in small town Iowa where she pursued two things, art, and Arabian horses.  After receiving her BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute, Kelly spent the next 22 years professionally training and showing Arabian horses.  Her students have won numerous top National honors in the United States and Canada.  Retiring in 2014 from professional riding, Kelly has returned full time to her art. Her history with addiction, rehab, recovery and Bipolar disorder lend her a unique perspective on the world around her.  Primarily using encaustic and photography, her work deals with social and political issues and erasing the stigma of mental illness

Sep
16
2022

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Sep
16
2022

DAAD Study Scholarship & Research Grant Information Session

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) offers recent undergraduates and graduate students the opportunity to study or research in Germany. Come hear about ways to further your education at a German University or pursue a research project.

Sep
16
2022

Pepper Center Rounds

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, No Location

The Center for Applied Health Research on Aging (CAHRA) and the Northwestern Pepper Center are pleased to present Pepper Center Rounds. Pepper Center Rounds are a venue to showcase high-quality research from scholars across the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers network. Please, join us! “From Claims to Community: Addressing the Poverty Penalty for Older Adults Living with a New Disability” Guest: Jason R. Falvey, PT, DPT, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science University of Maryland School of Medicine Bio: Dr. Falvey is a physical therapist and clinician-scientist with expertise using Medicare claims and national survey data to evaluate functional recovery, aging in place, and healthcare utilization among older adults recovering from acute hospitalization. His current work focuses on economic disparities in patient-centered outcomes, such as disability and aging in place, among older adults recovering from hospitalization. He is the second ever physical therapist to be funded by a Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award (K76) from the National Institute on Aging. His research on economic and social disparities in health outcomes among older adults has recently been published in high impact journals including JAMA Internal Medicine and his clinical and research expertise has been featured in news outlets such as the Washington Post, CNN News, and US News and World Reports. Dr. Falvey is also board-certified as a geriatric physical therapist, and still treats patients in a specialty Balance and Mobility Clinic in the Baltimore Veterans Administration Hospital.

Sep
16
2022

Norris at Night

9:00 PM - 11:00 PM, Evanston

Norris will welcome the Class of 2026 with lots of free food sampling, lots of swag, activities, live entertainment and amazing prizes.  The fun will begin at 9 p.m.  Norris at Night is one of the most memorable and fun nights on campus, not to be missed!

Sep
16
2022

Wildcat Welcome at the Dearborn Observatory

9:00 PM - 11:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is marking Wlidcat Welcome with a special walk-in only evening.  The evening is free and open to all--simply drop by between 9-11 pm.  All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Sep
17
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
17
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
17
2022

Trans and Nonbinary Paint and Sip

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Join Northwestern University Society of Trans and Non-Binary Student (NUSTANS) and Multicultural Student Affairs as we take time to connect over painting and snacks! No artistic skills required for painting or snacking! This space centers and celebrates the lived experiences of the Trans, Enby, Non-Binary, Genderqueer, and Gender Non-Confirming and Agender communities and is open to new AND returning students!

Sep
17
2022

Rainbow Bonfire

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

A Northwestern tradition for all incoming, returning, and transfer LGBTQIA+ students to gather and get to know one another around a bonfire on the Lake fill. This affinity space is co-hosted by Multicultural Student Affairs and Rainbow Alliance. This space centers and celebrates the lived experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bi+, Trans, Queer, Intersex, and Asexual Community. Rain location is the GSRC (3rd floor of Norris).

Sep
18
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
18
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
18
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Sep
18
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Sep
18
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Sep
18
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Sep
18
2022

Black to School BBQ

5:45 PM - 7:00 PM, Evanston

For Members Only (FMO), Northwestern's Black student alliance, invites you to join us for our kick-off event where you can learn more about our organization and be in community. Come join FMO to kick off the year with food, games, and community! This event is co-hosted by Multicultural Student Affairs.

Sep
19
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
19
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
19
2022

Beyond Basics: Student Feedback and Newest Canvas Updates

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This workshop shares with you the results of multiple years of student surveys on Canvas at Northwestern and the newest updates in Canvas related to those survey results. The advanced Canvas tips covered in this workshop are informed both by student feedback and the principles of Universal Design for Learning. Hear from Canvas experts which new features you might want to try out for fall 2022 and beyond. By the end of this workshop, you will know: 1. Which Canvas features or practices students identify as most helpful. 2. Tricks for maximizing your grading and feedback time. 3. The newest Canvas updates and features

Sep
19
2022

NSF GRFP, NDSEG, and Ford Predoctoral Fellowships Info Session

4:30 PM - 5:30 PM, Online

Interested in external funding for your graduate studies? Join this info session to learn about the application process for three popular funding sources for early career graduate students: NSF-GRFP, NDSEG, and the Ford Predoctoral Fellowship. Registration is required to attend. For questions, contact LaTanya Williams, Associate Director of STEM, Office of Fellowships, latanya.williams@northwestern.edu

Sep
20
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
20
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
20
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Sep
20
2022

Introduction to Canvas for Instructors

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Online

About this event:  Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Sep
21
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
21
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
21
2022

Fall 2022 Student Org Fair: TENTATIVE

10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Evanston

Undergraduates are invited to connect with representatives from nearly 400 registered student organizations at Northwestern to learn how to get involved. Look for more information about this event here and on the SOA website in August 2022.

Sep
21
2022

Grading and Assignments in Canvas

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

Learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas Prerequisite: Intro to Canvas Workshop. In this workshop, you'll learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Sep
21
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Sep
21
2022

DAAD Study Scholarship & Research Grant Information Session

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Online

The DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) offers recent undergraduates and graduate students the opportunity to study or research in Germany. Come hear about ways to further your education at a German University or pursue a research project.

Sep
22
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
22
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
22
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Sep
22
2022

Addressing the Healthcare Affordability Crisis

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Registration required. With many patients avoiding and foregoing care because of cost — and with many families enduring medical-debt burdens that threaten their well-being in multiple ways — affordability is a major threat to public health in the United States. Reform on a scale that would fully address this crisis seems unlikely in the near- or medium-term. A multi-year journalistic inquiry into the affordability crisis — its causes, consequences, and efforts to combat it — demonstrates both the inspiring possibilities and the current limitations of grassroots efforts "in the meantime" — i.e., in the absence of systemic reform.  Guest: Dan Weissmann Journalist Host and Executive Producer An Arm and a Leg podcast Dan Weissmann is a seasoned journalist and the creator and host of An Arm and a Leg, an award-winning podcast about the cost of health care. A former staff reporter for public radio’s Marketplace and Chicago’s WBEZ, Weissmann's stories have appeared on Planet Money, Reveal, Code Switch, Latino USA, and NPR’s All Things Considered and Morning Edition. For more public health news, events, and announcements, visit the IPHAM website: https://feinberg.northwestern.edu/ipham

Sep
22
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Sep
22
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Sep
22
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Sep
23
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
23
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
23
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Sep
23
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Sep
23
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Sep
23
2022

LGBTQ-focused Monkeypox Conversation

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM, Evanston

Do you have all the info you need? PROF. STEVEN THRASHER (Journalism/ISGMH) & PROF. CHAD HORNE (Philosophy) will lead an LGBTQ-focused conversation about prevention, care, community, and larger contexts. MASKING WILL BE REQUIRED AT THIS EVENT

Sep
23
2022

Friday Nights at the Dearborn Observatory

9:00 PM - 11:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Sep
24
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
24
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
24
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Sep
24
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Sep
24
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Sep
25
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
25
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
25
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Sep
25
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Sep
25
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Sep
25
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Sep
25
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Sep
25
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Sep
25
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Sep
26
2022

Fall Mini Course Early Registration

All day, No Location

Save money on a Mini Course for Fall Quarter!  You can find the list of all our current courses on the Mini Course website here. 

Sep
26
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
26
2022

DAAD Study Scholarship & Research Grant Information Session

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) offers recent undergraduates and graduate students the opportunity to study or research in Germany. Come hear about ways to further your education at a German University or pursue a research project.

Sep
27
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
27
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Sep
28
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
28
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Sep
28
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Sep
28
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Sep
28
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Sep
28
2022

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Sep
29
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
29
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Sep
29
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Sep
29
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Sep
29
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Sep
29
2022

The Epidemiology of Preventable Analytic Errors

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Chicago

Registration required. **HYBRID EVENT: This seminar is offered as a HYBRID event: join us IN-PERSON or ONLINE. Please register regardless and indicate your intended mode. The in-person event will be held in Baldwin Auditorium of the Lurie Medical Research Building at 303 E. Superior; Chicago. Boxed lunch will be provided for in person attendees.** With the growth of team science and big data, the increasing complexity of scientific research may make preventable errors -- such as those involving analytic methods or data collection -- more common. This talk will present results from the first scoping review of articles in clinical and translational science retracted for reasons related to errors in data capture, management, or analysis. The work characterizes these errors with the goal of improving both detection and prevention. Guest: Leah J. Welty, PhD Director, Biostatistics Collaboration Center Professor Department of Preventive Medicine - Biostatistics Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Leah Welty is a Professor in the Division of Biostatistics, Department of Preventive Medicine and in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and the Director of the Biostatistics Collaboration Center. Her research interests include longitudinal and multilevel models, psychiatric epidemiology, and the development of reproducible research tools for clinical and translational science This webinar is part of the Translational Applications in Public Health mini-series, which is a collaboration between the Institute for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM) and the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences (NUCATS) Institute.

Sep
30
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Sep
30
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Sep
30
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Sep
30
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Sep
30
2022

The Power and Passion of Beethoven

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Part of the 2022-23 Keyboard Conversations series Jeffrey Siegel, piano The “Moonlight” Sonata and the Sonata Op. 110, written after deafness had engulfed the composer. Keyboard Conversations subscription renewals for the 2022-23 season are now available to current subscribers. Renew by August 31, 2022 to continue receiving subscriber benefits. New subscriptions available now. Single tickets available September 7, 2022.

Sep
30
2022

Friday Nights at the Dearborn Observatory

9:00 PM - 11:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Oct
1
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
1
2022

Workshop Saturday

10:00 AM - 3:00 PM, Evanston

Not ready to commit to a full 6 weeks course? Join us on Saturday, October 1st,  and try workshop versions of our regular 6-week courses. We have morning sessions (10:00 am - 12:00 p.m.), and afternoon sessions (1:00 - 3:00 p.m.), and will conclude with a reception at 3:00 pm. Refreshments will be provided and our instructors will share what else will be offered in the fall! See all of our offered workshops on the Mini Courses website here!

Oct
1
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
1
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
1
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
2
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
2
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
2
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Oct
2
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
2
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
2
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
2
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
2
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
3
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
3
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section A

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section A Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
4
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
4
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
4
2022

Lyle Ungar, PhD: Understanding Psychological Traits Using Social Media Language

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

2022-2023 Digital Mental Health Lecture Series  The Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs) Northwestern University, in collaboration with the Society for Digital Mental Health  Lyle Ungar, PhD., University of Pennsylvania “Understanding Psychological Traits Using Social Media Language" Join us Tuesday, October 4th at:   Noon to 1pm, Central Time  Register to attend Zoom webinar.     About our guest speaker:  Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in Psychology, Bioengineering, Genomics and Computational Biology, and Operations, Information and Decisions.  He has published over 300 articles, supervised two dozen Ph.D. students, and is co-inventor on ten patents. His current research focuses on using natural language processing and explainable AI for psychological research, including analyzing social media and cell phone sensor data to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being. Upcoming Talks   November 1st, 2022, 12-1 pm CT, Jessica Schleider, PhD.  December 6th, 2022, 12-1 pm CT, Nicholas Jacobson, PhD.  

Oct
4
2022

Queer Parents

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Evanston

Please join us for this informal, private, monthly conversation.  We will discuss topics such as: parenting form within queer relationships and identities; supporting queer, trans, and nonbinary children in our lives; fostering an environment of expansive sexuality and gender identity for your children; navigating intergenerational conflict arund gender and sexuality; talking to your kids about homophobia, transphobia, and anti-LGBTQIA! movements in the U.S.   Open to all NU caregivers and parents.  Every first Tuesday of the month at noon.  Bring your own lunch. We will sit outside weather permitting.   

Oct
4
2022

Wheel Throwing II (Intermediate)

6:00 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing II is for students who have completed at least one wheel-throwing course in the past. In this course, Students will learn how to throw a large range of functional work and explore complex ways of decorating and glazing. From mugs and bowls, to large vases, plates and coffee pour-overs, this course is perfect for those who are looking to improve their throwing techniques and aesthetics. This course aims to improve the students confidence in their abilities and to connect the larger community within the studio. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class   Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
5
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
5
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section D

10:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section D Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
5
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
5
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
5
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
5
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
5
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section B

5:30 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section B Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
6
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
6
2022

Faculty & Staff Flu Shots

9:15 AM - 3:15 PM, Chicago

Human Resources has partnered with Empower Health Services (EHS) to host on-campus flu shot clinics in October. - The quadrivalent influenza vaccine will be offered. - Flu shots are free for benefits-eligible faculty & staff. - Non benefits-eligible employees can receive their shot for $36.50. Payment must be made by cash or check only. - You are also welcome to receive your flu shot on your own from your primary care physician or local pharmacy. - Students seeking flu shots should contact the Student Health Services Office.

Oct
6
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
6
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
6
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
6
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
6
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section C

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section C Instructor: Justin Elue

Oct
6
2022

Wheel Throwing III (Advanced)

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing III is for students who have completed multiple intermediate sessions, and are ready for more independence as an artist. Students will be working on several larger projects that aim at discussing concept, meaning, and aesthetic. Students should expect to begin working on a portfolio that showcases their concepts clearly. This course aims to grow students' understanding of ceramics as art. Students will be involved in creating an environment for ceramic art practices to bloom. This course is for dedicated artists looking to expand their concepts. Students will begin a social media account where they will share their works in progress, making work videos, and final products. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class

Oct
7
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
7
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
7
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
7
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
7
2022

Introduction to Canvas for Instructors

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

About this event:  Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Oct
7
2022

Reunion Weekend at the Dearborn Observatory

8:00 PM - 11:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is marking Reunion Weekend with a special three hour walk-in only evening.  The evening is free and open to all--simply drop by between 8-11 pm.  All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Oct
8
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
8
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
8
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
8
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
8
2022

Performance: Mendi + Keith Obadike – "Numbers Station 2 [Red Record]"

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM, Evanston

In this piece, artists Mendi + Keith Obadike sonify data from Ida B. Wells' 1895 publication, The Red Record: Tabulated Statistics and Alleged Causes of Lynching in the United States, with chants and sounds generated from the dates of lynching contained in Wells' text. This is the second work in Mendi + Keith Obadike's Number Series (2015–present), a series of performances and sound installations that use numerical databases of violence (police harassment, lynching statistics, and slave ship manifests) to generate sonic information. This performance will be preceded by a One Book One Northwestern gallery talk at the neighboring Block Museum of Art. Guests are welcome to join us for one or both programs; registration required.

Oct
9
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
9
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
9
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Oct
9
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
9
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
9
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
9
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
9
2022

Sir András Schiff, piano

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Tickets to this event are currently SOLD OUT. A limited number of tickets may become available on or after September 9. Part of the Skyline Piano Artist Series  Winner of the 2021 Jean Gimbel Lane Prize in Piano Performance  Sir András Schiff, piano The Boston Globe hails Sir András Schiff as “one of the most penetratingly serious masters of the keyboard before the public today. Full stop.” Born in Budapest, Schiff studied with Pal Kadosa, György Kurtág, and Ferenc Rados and in London with George Malcolm. He is noted for his performances of special cycles, including the complete keyboard works of Bach, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, and Bartók. Founder of the chamber orchestra Cappella Andrea Barca, he also works closely with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, the Budapest Festival Orchestra, and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. His many honors include the International Mozarteum Foundation’s Golden Medal, Germany’s Great Cross of Merit with Star, a knighthood for services to music, and an honorary doctorate from London’s Royal College of Music.  2022-23 Skyline Piano Artist Series subscription renewals now available to current subscribers.  New subscriptions available August 19, 2022. Single tickets available September 16, 2022.

Oct
9
2022

Beyoncé Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

The “Beyoncé Mass,” a groundbreaking Christian worship service, features Beyonce’s music that celebrates the spirituality of Black women. Created and curated by Rev. Yolanda Norton, the worship service uses the music and life of Beyoncé as a tool to cultivate an empowering conversation about Black women and create an experience of story, scripture, and song that calls for the liberation of all people.

Oct
9
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
10
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
10
2022

Panopto for Video Assignments

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview of using Panopto to accept student video submissions through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to give students the instructions they need to create and submit video assignments. This session will also go over reviewing and grading video submissions.

Oct
10
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section A

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section A Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
11
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
11
2022

Faculty & Staff Flu Shots

9:15 AM - 3:15 PM, Evanston

Human Resources has partnered with Empower Health Services (EHS) to host on-campus flu shot clinics in October. - The quadrivalent influenza vaccine will be offered. - Flu shots are free for benefits-eligible faculty & staff. - Non benefits-eligible employees can receive their shot for $36.50. Payment must be made by cash or check only. - You are also welcome to receive your flu shot on your own from your primary care physician or local pharmacy. - Students seeking flu shots should contact the Student Health Services Office.

Oct
11
2022

Women's Center Open House Evanston Campus

10:00 AM - 3:00 PM, Evanston

Open House at the Evanston Women's Center. Walk through and see what's new. Chat with WC Staff on the lawn. Walk through to check out new art and info. Find out what we have coming up and how you can be involved. Enjoy free snacks and SWAG. Tuesday October 11th between ten and three. 2000 Sheridan Road. 

Oct
11
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
11
2022

Astro Seminar: Emanuele Berti: TBA

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Abstract: TBA Speaker: Emanuele Berti, Professor, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore Host: Professor Giacomo Fragione

Oct
11
2022

Wheel Throwing II (Intermediate)

6:00 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing II is for students who have completed at least one wheel-throwing course in the past. In this course, Students will learn how to throw a large range of functional work and explore complex ways of decorating and glazing. From mugs and bowls, to large vases, plates and coffee pour-overs, this course is perfect for those who are looking to improve their throwing techniques and aesthetics. This course aims to improve the students confidence in their abilities and to connect the larger community within the studio. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class   Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
11
2022

Gays and Gospel

7:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Evanston

Dean E. Patrick Johnson and Assistant Professor of Instruction, Kent R. Brooks take audiences on a journey from gospel music’s roots to the contemporary moment, acknowledging how Black queer artists helped shape a musical genre that transformed the world.

Oct
12
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
12
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section D

10:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section D Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
12
2022

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Oct
12
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
12
2022

Fireside Chat with with former U.S. ambassador Steven McGann

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Evanston

Please join the Northwestern Buffett Institute for Global Affairs for a fireside chat with former U.S. ambassador Steven McGann on Wednesday, October 12 from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. CDT (GMT-5). Steven McGann, a retired Senior Foreign Service Officer with the rank of Minister-Counselor, was the U.S. ambassador to the Republics of Fiji, Nauru, Kiribati, and the Kingdom of Tonga and Tuvalu from 2008 to 2011. Ambassador McGann was also assigned as Chief of Mission (ad interim) of the United States Embassy in Dili, Timor-Leste. He is the founder of The Stevenson Group, a consulting firm based in Washington, D.C. that identifies opportunities in the security sector and implements specialized advisory services focused on strengthening public-private partnerships. Register to attend in-person or virtually via zoom.

Oct
12
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
12
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
12
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
12
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section B

5:30 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section B Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
13
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
13
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
13
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
13
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
13
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
13
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section C

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section C Instructor: Justin Elue

Oct
13
2022

Wheel Throwing III (Advanced)

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing III is for students who have completed multiple intermediate sessions, and are ready for more independence as an artist. Students will be working on several larger projects that aim at discussing concept, meaning, and aesthetic. Students should expect to begin working on a portfolio that showcases their concepts clearly. This course aims to grow students' understanding of ceramics as art. Students will be involved in creating an environment for ceramic art practices to bloom. This course is for dedicated artists looking to expand their concepts. Students will begin a social media account where they will share their works in progress, making work videos, and final products. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class

Oct
14
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
14
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
14
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
14
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
14
2022

Grading and Assignments in Canvas

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM, Online

Learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas Prerequisite: Intro to Canvas Workshop. In this workshop, you'll learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Oct
14
2022

Northwestern Day at the Art Institute

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Off-Campus

Northwestern students, faculty, staff, and their guests enjoy free admission to the Art Institute. More information about Northwestern’s museum partnerships is available in the ‘students’ section of the SOA website: northwestern.edu/studentorgs

Oct
14
2022

Friday Nights at the Dearborn Observatory

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 8 to 10 pm during the fall and winter months (Oct-Mar). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Oct
15
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
15
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
15
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
15
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
15
2022

Northwestern University Symphony Orchestra

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Donald Schleicher, guest music director Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony No. 6 in F Major (“Pastoral”) Dmitri Shostakovich, Symphony No. 12 in D Minor (“The Year 1917”)

Oct
16
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
16
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
16
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Oct
16
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
16
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
16
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
16
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
16
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
16
2022

Victoria Marshall and Tim Lambert, conducting

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM, Evanston

Masters of Music  Students of Donald Nally  Timothy Corlis, “Gloria” from Missa Pax  Arvo Pärt, The Woman with the Alabaster Box  J. S. Bach, Komm, Jesu, Komm, BWV 229  Giles Swayne, Magnificat I, Op. 33  Johannes Brahms, “Im Herbst” from Fünf Gesang, Op. 104  Jonathan Dove, The Passing of the Year  Tickets are not required for this event.

Oct
17
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
17
2022

Beyond Basics: Mastering Templates and Pages in Canvas

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

Have you ever tried to build a great page in Canvas but got stuck? Would you like an aesthetically pleasing course layout that you can use quarter after quarter? This workshop digs into visual design and organizational elements available in Canvas and using templates and HTML to build great-looking, student-friendly sites. No prior knowledge of HTML is needed for this workshop. How Your Canvas Course Looks Matters: * A well-organized course decreases the time students need to spend looking for things in your course. * A course that reflects your personality, course philosophy, or teaching style helps students get to know you.   By the end of this workshop, you will know how to: 1. Import templates into your course sites 2. Alter templates and pages using the rich content editor and HTML 3. Build great-looking pages (with or without templates)

Oct
17
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section A

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section A Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
18
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
18
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
18
2022

Wheel Throwing II (Intermediate)

6:00 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing II is for students who have completed at least one wheel-throwing course in the past. In this course, Students will learn how to throw a large range of functional work and explore complex ways of decorating and glazing. From mugs and bowls, to large vases, plates and coffee pour-overs, this course is perfect for those who are looking to improve their throwing techniques and aesthetics. This course aims to improve the students confidence in their abilities and to connect the larger community within the studio. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class   Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
19
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
19
2022

Faculty & Staff Flu Shots

9:15 AM - 3:15 PM, Chicago

Human Resources has partnered with Empower Health Services (EHS) to host on-campus flu shot clinics in October. - The quadrivalent influenza vaccine will be offered. - Flu shots are free for benefits-eligible faculty & staff. - Non benefits-eligible employees can receive their shot for $36.50. Payment must be made by cash or check only. - You are also welcome to receive your flu shot on your own from your primary care physician or local pharmacy. - Students seeking flu shots should contact the Student Health Services Office.

Oct
19
2022

Exams and Quizzes

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

This workshop will prepare instructors to create quizzes and exams in Canvas. Participants will learn about question types, question banks, quiz settings including time limits, and grading functions. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Oct
19
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section D

10:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section D Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
19
2022

Women's Center Open House, Chicago Campus

10:00 AM - 3:00 PM, Chicago

Open House at the Women's Center. Walk through and see what's new. Chat with WC Staff, Masks required. Walk through to check out new art and info. Find out what we have coming up and how you can be involved. Enjoy free snacks and SWAG. Wednesday October 19th between ten and three. 1400 Abbott Hall, 710 Lake Shore DuSable Drive. 

Oct
19
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
19
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
19
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
19
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
19
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section B

5:30 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section B Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
20
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
20
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
20
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
20
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
20
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
20
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section C

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section C Instructor: Justin Elue

Oct
20
2022

Social Justice Tour of Northwestern University

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM, Evanston

Join us for a live sample selection from three existing GPS-guided audio walking tours: The Indigenous, Black Experience, and Feminist Campus tours.

Oct
20
2022

Remembering Illinois’s Early Black History

5:30 PM - 7:00 PM, Evanston

History professor Kate Masur will discuss the little-known history of African Americans in Illinois in the 1840s-1860s, highlighting the work of the Northwestern-based team that developed the website: Black Organizing in Pre-Civil War Illinois: Creating Community, Demanding Justice. Space is limited, pre-registration is required.

Oct
20
2022

Wheel Throwing III (Advanced)

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing III is for students who have completed multiple intermediate sessions, and are ready for more independence as an artist. Students will be working on several larger projects that aim at discussing concept, meaning, and aesthetic. Students should expect to begin working on a portfolio that showcases their concepts clearly. This course aims to grow students' understanding of ceramics as art. Students will be involved in creating an environment for ceramic art practices to bloom. This course is for dedicated artists looking to expand their concepts. Students will begin a social media account where they will share their works in progress, making work videos, and final products. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class

Oct
20
2022

Yunchan Lim, piano

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Tickets to this event are currently SOLD OUT. A limited number of tickets may become available on or after September 9. Part of the Skyline Piano Artist Series Cliburn Competition Gold Medalist Yunchan Lim, piano Yunchan Lim debuted on the international stage at age 14, garnering prizes at the Cleveland International Piano Competition for Young Artists and the Cooper International Competition. He became the youngest entrant to win Korea’s IsangYun International Competition in 2019, and in 2022 he won the prestigious Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. He has performed across South Korea with the Korean Orchestra Festival, Korea Symphony, Suwon Philharmonic, and Busan Philharmonic Orchestra, and he appeared in Madrid at the invitation of the Korea Cultural Center in Spain. A native of Siheung, he currently studies with Minsoo Sohn at the Korea National University of Arts.  2022-23 Skyline Piano Artist Series subscription renewals now available to current subscribers.  New subscriptions available August 19, 2022. Single tickets available September 16, 2022.

Oct
21
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
21
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
21
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
21
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
21
2022

Symphonic Wind Ensemble

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Mallory Thompson, conductor The Symphonic Wind Ensemble opens the academic year with Leonard Bernstein’s rousing overture to Candide, followed by Jennifer Higdon’s wind arrangement of her setting of the Latin chant O Magnum Mysterium. Higdon shares that the work is a “tribute to the wonderful mystery of how music moves us.” The program continues with Ryan Lindveit’s evocative Mysterious Butterflies, composed as a tribute to the founder of neuroscience, Santiago Ramón y Cajal. Lindveit explains that he was “deeply inspired by the idea that the human quest for understanding the mysteries of life can—even should—be beautiful and elegant, like a flower garden filled with butterflies.” Concluding the concert is Paul Hindemith’s classic Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber, as transcribed by Keith Wilson.

Oct
21
2022

Friday Nights at the Dearborn Observatory

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 8 to 10 pm during the fall and winter months (Oct-Mar). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Oct
22
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
22
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
22
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
22
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
22
2022

Contemporary Music Ensemble

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Part of the Joan La Barbara Residency Ben Bolter, conductor In its first concert of the academic year, the Contemporary Music Ensemble performs Elijah Smith’s Scions of an Atlas, a work premiered by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 2021. Also featured is Joan La Barbara’s Awakenings, a sound painting about awakening from an extended state of sleep to a new world; the work was inspired by the Oliver Sacks book of the same name. Rounding out the program is David Lang’s Jimi Hendrix–inspired tuba concerto, Are You Experienced?

Oct
23
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
23
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
23
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Oct
23
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
23
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
23
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
23
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
23
2022

Symphonic Band

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Shawn Vondran, conductor Ryan George, Firefly Eric Whitacre, October Gordon Jacob, An Original Suite Nicole Piunno, Bright Shadow Fanfare Tielman Susato (arr. Patrick Dunnigan), Selections from The Danserye

Oct
23
2022

Bienen Contemporary/Early Vocal Ensemble: Evensong

4:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Off-Campus

Donald Nally and Jack Reeder, conductors; Scott Dettra, organ; Luke Lentini, string leader   The ensemble’s annual Evensong concert follows the ritual and structure of the ancient liturgy, woven together with contemporary works reflecting issues of our time. David Lang’s the national anthems (with string quartet) magnifies the hopes and fears expressed in the anthems of many nations of the world, while Herbert Howells’s “Now Abideth Faith, Hope, and Charity” contemplates how we treat each other.  Tickets are not required for this event.

Oct
23
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
24
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
24
2022

Faculty & Staff Flu Shots

9:15 AM - 3:15 PM, Evanston

Human Resources has partnered with Empower Health Services (EHS) to host on-campus flu shot clinics in October. - The quadrivalent influenza vaccine will be offered. - Flu shots are free for benefits-eligible faculty & staff. - Non benefits-eligible employees can receive their shot for $36.50. Payment must be made by cash or check only. - You are also welcome to receive your flu shot on your own from your primary care physician or local pharmacy. - Students seeking flu shots should contact the Student Health Services Office.

Oct
24
2022

DAAD RISE Info Session

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The DAAD Research Internship in Science and Engineering offers funded summer research internships at top German universities and research institutions! Open to students in STEM and Engineering fields. Current Sophomores and Juniors are eligible. Students apply to 3 opportunities that best match their area of interest. German language ability desirable, but not required. 

Oct
24
2022

Beyond Basics: Student Feedback and Newest Canvas Updates

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This workshop shares with you the results of multiple years of student surveys on Canvas at Northwestern and the newest updates in Canvas related to those survey results. The advanced Canvas tips covered in this workshop are informed both by student feedback and the principles of Universal Design for Learning. Hear from Canvas experts which new features you might want to try out for fall 2022 and beyond. By the end of this workshop, you will know: 1. Which Canvas features or practices students identify as most helpful. 2. Tricks for maximizing your grading and feedback time. 3. The newest Canvas updates and features

Oct
24
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section A

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section A Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
24
2022

Jazz Small Ensembles: The Muse of MJQ

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Kevin Fort, conductor Established in 1951, the Modern Jazz Quartet was no ordinary jazz quartet. It distinguished itself as one of the most innovative ensembles in jazz history, combining jazz elements with techniques from other eras and styles, notably Bach’s contrapuntal art. Active longer than any other jazz quartet in history, MJQ produced a vast body of work ideal for research, exploration, and reevaluation. This program includes jazz students’ new arrangements of such MJQ classics as Django, Fontessa, Two Bass Hit, and Bluesology.

Oct
25
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
25
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
25
2022

Academic Energies: A Conversation Beyond Coping - Tina Chen with Nitasha Tamar Sharma

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

As we begin a new school year three years into a global pandemic and worldwide turmoil, how might we move in, through, and beyond academic cynicism and exhaustion? How can we rethink academic energies to reach a more sustainable and capacious notion of scholarly work alongside a life well lived? How have faculty revisited the question of “work-life balance”? This conversation between invited speaker Tina Chen and Nitasha Tamar Sharma will address these questions with a particular focus on academic labor, the gender and racial dynamics of service and family care, and the challenging structures of colleges and universities today. We hope this conversation joins discussions that others in and out of the academy are having about the possibilities of a changing university and new approaches to the oft-competing priorities that shape our lives. This conversation is part of the Kaplan Humanities Institute's 2022-2023 Dialogue, ENERGIES: A year-long conversation about energies—personal, collective, planetary—from different humanistic perspectives. About the speakers Tina Chen is Associate Professor of English and Asian American Studies at Penn State University where she is also Director of the Global Asias Initiative. She is the Founding Editor of Verge: Studies in Global Asias. She is the mother of a college freshman, someone who lives with breast cancer, and a scholar-teacher committed to developing platforms that encourage multidisciplinary engagement and the cross-pollination of knowledge across disciplinary and field boundaries. She is currently working on Alien Forms: Global Asias and the Speculative Genres of Academic Labor, a monograph that questions the ways in which academic labor has been parsed into the categories of “research, teaching, and service” and argues for a more expansive notion of scholarly work.  Nitasha Tamar Sharma is the mother of two young children and a professor of African American Studies and Asian American Studies at Northwestern. She is the author or co-editor of four books and is an Associate Editor of American Quarterly. At Northwestern, Nitasha is the director of the Asian American Studies Program and co-director of the Council for Race and Ethnic Studies.

Oct
25
2022

Joan La Barbara Composition Colloquium

5:00 PM - 6:30 PM, Evanston

Part of the Joan La Barbara Residency Composer, performer, sound artist, and actor Joan La Barbara is known for developing a unique vocabulary of experimental and extended vocal techniques, influencing generations of composers and singers. Her numerous commissions include compositions for multiple voices, chamber ensembles, orchestra, and interactive technology as well as scores for dance, video, and film productions. Her work has been presented at the Brisbane Biennial, Festival d’Automne à Paris, Warsaw Autumn, and MaerzMusik Berlin. Currently on the Mannes School of Music faculty, La Barbara has premiered compositions written for her by Philip Glass and Robert Wilson, Morton Feldman, Steve Reich, John Cage, and Alvin Lucier.  Tickets are not required for this event.

Oct
25
2022

Wheel Throwing II (Intermediate)

6:00 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing II is for students who have completed at least one wheel-throwing course in the past. In this course, Students will learn how to throw a large range of functional work and explore complex ways of decorating and glazing. From mugs and bowls, to large vases, plates and coffee pour-overs, this course is perfect for those who are looking to improve their throwing techniques and aesthetics. This course aims to improve the students confidence in their abilities and to connect the larger community within the studio. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class   Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Oct
26
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
26
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section D

10:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section D Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
26
2022

Introduction to Canvas for Instructors

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM, Online

About this event:  Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Oct
26
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
26
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
26
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
26
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
26
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section B

5:30 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section B Instructor: Ranch Ward

Oct
27
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
27
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Oct
27
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Oct
27
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
27
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
27
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
27
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section C

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section C Instructor: Justin Elue

Oct
27
2022

Presentation by Kerry McCarthy

5:30 PM - 7:00 PM, Evanston

Part of the William Byrd Festival Musician, musicologist, and author Kerry McCarthy discusses composer William Byrd and English singers of his time. McCarthy’s 2013 Byrd biography, published by Oxford University Press, received the 2014 ASCAP Nicolas Slonimsky Award for composer biography.  Tickets are not required for this event.

Oct
27
2022

Wheel Throwing III (Advanced)

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing III is for students who have completed multiple intermediate sessions, and are ready for more independence as an artist. Students will be working on several larger projects that aim at discussing concept, meaning, and aesthetic. Students should expect to begin working on a portfolio that showcases their concepts clearly. This course aims to grow students' understanding of ceramics as art. Students will be involved in creating an environment for ceramic art practices to bloom. This course is for dedicated artists looking to expand their concepts. Students will begin a social media account where they will share their works in progress, making work videos, and final products. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class

Oct
28
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
28
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Oct
28
2022

DAAD RISE Info Session

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Online

The DAAD Research Internship in Science and Engineering offers funded summer research internships at top German universities and research institutions! Open to students in STEM and Engineering fields. Current Sophomores and Juniors are eligible. Students apply to 3 opportunities that best match their area of interest. German language ability desirable, but not required. 

Oct
28
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
28
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
28
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
28
2022

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Oct
28
2022

An Evening with Universes

7:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Chicago

Writers and performers Steven Sapp and Mildred Ruiz-Sapp, founders of the award-winning theatre company Universes, fuse poetry, theatre, music and dance to tell stories of struggle, resistance, and the power of collective action.

Oct
28
2022

Bienen Contemporary/Early Vocal Ensemble

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

Part of the William Byrd Festival Pre-concert talk by guest scholar Dr. Kerry McCarthy, 6:45 p.m. Donald Nally, Logan Henke, Tim Lambert, Victoria Marshall, and Jack Reeder, conductors; Charles Foster, virginal The William Byrd Festival explores the composer’s secular side through a sampling of his gracefully plaintive, melancholy Songs of Sundrie Natures and Songs of Sadness and Pietie. The intimate sounds of the virginal evoke the turn of the 17th century— a time of sophisticated courtly chamber music, political intrigue, and musical evolution.

Oct
28
2022

Friday Nights at the Dearborn Observatory

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 8 to 10 pm during the fall and winter months (Oct-Mar). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Oct
29
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
29
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Oct
29
2022

Understanding the Historic Evanston Black Community

11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

This tour will showcase the history and movement of the Black community in Evanston from 1900 to present day to reveal a pattern that resembles what we have seen in the greater historical narrative that has affected the Evanston community we know today.

Oct
29
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
29
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
29
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
29
2022

Open Dress Rehearsal

2:15 PM - 4:00 PM, Evanston

Part of the William Byrd Festival A preview of the October 30 “Music for Voices and Viols” program.  Tickets are not required for this event.

Oct
29
2022

Guitar Ensemble

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Anne Waller, director Music written and arranged for guitar soloists, duos, trios, and full ensemble.

Oct
29
2022

Northwestern University Chamber Orchestra

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Part of the Joan La Barbara Residency Robert G. Hasty, conductor; Lauryn Nelson, mezzo-soprano A program exploring themes of fear, death, and the supernatural. Bernard Herrmann, Psycho: A Suite for Strings Luigi Boccherini, Symphony No. 6 in D Minor (“La casa del diavolo”) Jean Sibelius, “Valse triste” from Kuolema (Death) Joan La Barbara, In solitude this fear is lived Manuel de Falla, El amor brujo

Oct
30
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
30
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Oct
30
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
30
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Oct
30
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
30
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Oct
30
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Oct
30
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Oct
30
2022

Mini-Recital: William Byrd's Virginal Music

2:15 PM - 4:00 PM, Evanston

Part of the William Byrd Festival A recital highlighting the virginal—a keyboard instrument from the harpsichord family that was popular during the late Renaissance and early Baroque periods—featuring Stephen Alltop and Bienen student performers.  Tickets are not required for this event.

Oct
30
2022

Music for Voices and Viols by William Byrd

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Part of the William Byrd Festival Craig Trompeter, Anna Steinhoff, Russell Wagner, Phillip Serna, Kate Shuldiner, and Morgan Little, viol; Alice Millar Chapel Choir and Soloists  A concert of music by Byrd for solo voices, choir, and viols, including the Mass for Five Voices, “Christ Rising Again,” Ave verum corpus, and Miserere mei, Deus as well as selected works for viol consort.    Tickets are not required for this event.

Oct
30
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Oct
31
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Oct
31
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Oct
31
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section A

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section A Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Nov
1
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
1
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
1
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Nov
1
2022

Jessica L. Schleider, PhD: Harnessing Single-Session Interventions to Promote Mental Health at Scale

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

2022-2023 Digital Mental Health Lecture Series  The Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs) Northwestern University, in collaboration with the Society for Digital Mental Health  Jessica L. Schleider, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University “Understanding Psychological Traits Using Social Media Language" Join us Tuesday, November 1st at:   Noon to 1pm, Central Time  Register to attend Zoom webinar.     About our guest speaker:  Dr. Jessica L. Schleider (she/her/hers) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program at Stony Brook University (SUNY).  She also serves as a Faculty Affiliate at the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and was an Academic Consultant to the World Bank's Education Global Practice.  Dr. Schleider completed her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Harvard University in 2018, along with a Doctoral Internship in Clinical and Community Psychology at Yale School of Medicine. She graduated with a B.A. in Psychology from Swarthmore College in 2012. Her research on brief, scalable interventions for depression and anxiety in young people has been funded by the NIH, NSF, and HRSA and recognized via numerous awards, including the NIH Director's Early Independence Award; the ABCT President's New Researcher Award; the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology's Susan Nolen-Hoeksema Early Career Research Award; and the Society of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology's Abidin Early Career Award. Her work has been featured in the Atlantic, Vox, and U.S. News & World Report, among others. In 2020, she was chosen as one of Forbes' 30 Under 30 in Healthcare.    Dr. Schleider has published >80 scientific articles and book chapters. She has created or co-created five open-access, single-session mental health programs, which have served >10,000 teens and adults to date. Based on these programs, Dr. Schleider wrote a self-help workbook, The Growth Mindset Workbook for Teens (New Harbinger). She also co-edited the Oxford Guide to Brief and Low-Intensity Interventions for Children and Young People (Oxford University Press) and is writing a nonfiction book (Little, Brown Book Group) on how brief interventions and meaningful moments can transform mental health.  Upcoming Talks   December 6, 2022, 12-1 pm CT, Nicholas Jacobson, PhD. January 3, 2023, 12-1 pm CT, Speaker To Be Announced

Nov
1
2022

Wheel Throwing II (Intermediate)

6:00 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing II is for students who have completed at least one wheel-throwing course in the past. In this course, Students will learn how to throw a large range of functional work and explore complex ways of decorating and glazing. From mugs and bowls, to large vases, plates and coffee pour-overs, this course is perfect for those who are looking to improve their throwing techniques and aesthetics. This course aims to improve the students confidence in their abilities and to connect the larger community within the studio. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class   Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Nov
2
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
2
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
2
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section D

10:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section D Instructor: Ranch Ward

Nov
2
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Nov
2
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
2
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
2
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
2
2022

Study Abroad Fair 2022

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

The Study Abroad Fair is an opportunity to learn more about the different credit-bearing study abroad programs offered at Northwestern. Chat with program providers, Global Learning Office (GLO) advisers, and student ambassadors who can tell you about their first hand experience studying abroad.   

Nov
2
2022

Accounting for Slavery: a history of management practices

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM, No Location

Accounting for Slavery explores the development of business practices on slave plantations and uses this history to understand the relationship between violence and innovation. The author, Caitlin Rosenthal will give brief remarks about her book and then be in conversation with a Northwestern professor about the book. A Q&A session will follow.

Nov
2
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section B

5:30 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section B Instructor: Ranch Ward

Nov
3
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
3
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
3
2022

Grading and Assignments in Canvas

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

Learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas Prerequisite: Intro to Canvas Workshop. In this workshop, you'll learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Nov
3
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Nov
3
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
3
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
3
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
3
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section C

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section C Instructor: Justin Elue

Nov
3
2022

Sand Creek Massacre Commemoration

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM, No Location

Honor the Cheyenne and Arapaho peoples who were killed by United States soldiers during an attack of their village and reflect on Northwestern’s role in supporting the healing efforts. Cheyenne and Arapaho communities as well as Indigenous communities globally. These events are free and open to the campus community. Join us in one or all three events. • Nov. 3 @ 3:30 PM Viewing and Discussion: Only the Mountains • Nov. 10 @ 3:00 PM Indigenous Art Making • Nov. 17 @ 3:00 PM Procession & Fire

Nov
3
2022

Wheel Throwing III (Advanced)

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing III is for students who have completed multiple intermediate sessions, and are ready for more independence as an artist. Students will be working on several larger projects that aim at discussing concept, meaning, and aesthetic. Students should expect to begin working on a portfolio that showcases their concepts clearly. This course aims to grow students' understanding of ceramics as art. Students will be involved in creating an environment for ceramic art practices to bloom. This course is for dedicated artists looking to expand their concepts. Students will begin a social media account where they will share their works in progress, making work videos, and final products. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class

Nov
4
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
4
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
4
2022

DAAD RISE Info Session

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The DAAD Research Internship in Science and Engineering offers funded summer research internships at top German universities and research institutions! Open to students in STEM and Engineering fields. Current Sophomores and Juniors are eligible. Students apply to 3 opportunities that best match their area of interest. German language ability desirable, but not required. 

Nov
4
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
4
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
4
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
4
2022

Angela Hewitt, piano

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Tickets to this event are currently SOLD OUT. A limited number of tickets may become available on or after September 9. Part of the Skyline Piano Artist Series  Angela Hewitt, piano The New York Times praises pianist Angela Hewitt’s “instant link from head and heart to fingertips.” Widely considered one of the foremost Bach interpreters of our time, Hewitt appears in recital and as soloist with major orchestras throughout Europe, the Americas, Australia, and Asia. In 2020 she became the first woman to receive the City of Leipzig Bach Medal and was awarded the Wigmore Hall Gold Medal in recognition of 35 years of performances in the prestigious London chamber music venue. Conducting concertos of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven from the piano, Hewitt has led the Toronto Symphony, Hong Kong Philharmonic, and Copenhagen Philharmonic, among many others. She was named Artist of the Year at the 2006 Gramophone Awards, Instrumentalist of the Year at the 2010 MIDEM Classical Awards at Cannes, and winner of Canada’s Governor General’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2018.  Johann Sebastian Bach, Preludes and Fugues Nos. 5-8 from The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II  W.A. Mozart, Piano Sonata No. 8 in A minor, K. 310  W.A. Mozart, Piano Sonata No. 9 in D major, K. 311  Frédéric Chopin, Nocturnes, Op. 62  Frédéric Chopin, Scherzo No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 31   

Nov
4
2022

Family Weekend Friday at the Dearborn Observatory

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is marking Family Weekend with a special walk-in only evening.  The evening is free and open to all--simply drop by between 8-10 pm.  All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Nov
5
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
5
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
5
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
5
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
5
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
5
2022

Percussion Ensemble

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

She-e Wu, director An evening of eclectic rhythms.

Nov
5
2022

Robert Barto, lute

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Part of the Segovia Classical Guitar Series Robert Barto, lute A specialist in historical lute performance, Robert Barto studied on a Fulbright scholarship with Michael Schaeffer in Cologne and Eugen Dombois in Basel. In 1984 he was awarded first prize in the International Lute Competition in Toronto as well as the top instrumental soloist prize in the Musica Antiqua Competition in Belgium. Barto’s engagements throughout Europe and North America have included solo recitals at the Festival of Flanders, the Utrecht Festival, New York City’s Music Before 1800, and London’s Purcell Room. An in-demand teacher, he frequently serves on the Lute Society of America summer school faculty and has led courses in Sweden, Italy, and Spain. Recent tours have included concerts and a master class in Tokyo. Barto’s program highlights the music of late Baroque lutenists Sylvius Leopold Weiss and Bernhard Joachim Hagen.  2022-23 Segovia Classical Guitar Series subscription renewals now available to current subscribers.  New subscriptions available August 19, 2022. Single tickets available September 16, 2022.

Nov
5
2022

Family Weekend Saturday at the Dearborn Observatory

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is marking Family Weekend with a special walk-in only evening.  The evening is free and open to all--simply drop by between 8-10 pm.  All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Nov
6
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
6
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
6
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Nov
6
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Nov
6
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Nov
6
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
6
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
6
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
6
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Nov
6
2022

Baroque Music Ensemble: Concerto Night

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Stephen Alltop, conductor The Baroque Music Ensemble offers a program of thrilling concertos for violin, flute, oboe, trumpet, and harpsichord by Bach and Vivaldi, including Bach’s ever-popular Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F Major.

Nov
7
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
7
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
7
2022

Active Learning Activities & Methods for Your Course

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Active learning is an instruction methodology that takes students past listen and taking notes passively and moves them towards developing skills and higher order thinking through activities. These activities might include, discussion, writing, reading, hands-on approaches, and other that allow them to actively build new knowledge and understanding. Active learning activities are often, though not exclusively, collaborative. In this hands-on session, you will engage with active learning techniques through a tangible deck of "active learning activities" that you'll get to keep once the session is over. You will learn how to evaluate which activities might work best for your course, and strategies on how to implement them. During this hands-on session, participants will: * Understand the basics of active learning * Gain a deck of active learning resources * Develop a plan for how to implement one or more

Nov
7
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section A

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section A Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Nov
8
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
8
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
8
2022

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Nov
8
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Nov
8
2022

Truman Info Session

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Election Day Introduction to the Truman Application

Nov
8
2022

Wheel Throwing II (Intermediate)

6:00 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing II is for students who have completed at least one wheel-throwing course in the past. In this course, Students will learn how to throw a large range of functional work and explore complex ways of decorating and glazing. From mugs and bowls, to large vases, plates and coffee pour-overs, this course is perfect for those who are looking to improve their throwing techniques and aesthetics. This course aims to improve the students confidence in their abilities and to connect the larger community within the studio. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class   Instructor: Tomoyasu Nakano

Nov
8
2022

Northwestern University Jazz Orchestra: The Music That Made the Harlem Renaissance

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Derrick Gardner, conductor Take a journey to a period when music, dance, art, fashion, literature, theater, politics, and scholarship told the cultural story of Black Americans in the Upper Manhattan neighborhood known as Harlem. This swinging affair features music of composers who contributed significantly to jazz in the 1920s and ’30s, including Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Don Redman, Benny Moten, Fletcher Henderson, Cab Calloway, Mary Lou Williams, and Andy Kirk.

Nov
9
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
9
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
9
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section D

10:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section D Instructor: Ranch Ward

Nov
9
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Nov
9
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
9
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
9
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
9
2022

Introduction to Canvas for Instructors

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

About this event:  Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Nov
9
2022

DAAD RISE Info Session

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Online

The DAAD Research Internship in Science and Engineering offers funded summer research internships at top German universities and research institutions! Open to students in STEM and Engineering fields. Current Sophomores and Juniors are eligible. Students apply to 3 opportunities that best match their area of interest. German language ability desirable, but not required. 

Nov
9
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section B

5:30 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section B Instructor: Ranch Ward

Nov
10
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
10
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
10
2022

Recording Lectures Using Panopto

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview of fundamental Panopto features and demonstrates how to access and use Panopto through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to start recording their own videos or narrated presentations.

Nov
10
2022

White Light Therapy

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Chicago

WELL has partnered with the Women's Center to provide light therapy on the Chicago campus Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. All are welcome in the space. This service is available on the Evanston campus in the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Wellness Suite.  Light therapy, exposure to artificial light, can be a safe and effective way to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and some types of depression and sleep disorders. Benefits that may be experienced include: alleviation of SAD symptoms and other types of depression, and improvement in sleep disorders, mood and energy.  Completion of a one-time e-consent form is required. See "More Info" to access the e-consent form. 

Nov
10
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
10
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
10
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
10
2022

Wheel Throwing I (Beginner) - Section C

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM, Evanston

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of making functional ceramic art. In this course, students will begin with the process of wheel throwing with detailed instruction on how to throw a cylinder, bowl, and much more. The kinesthetic process of pottery will be explored through developing technical skills on the wheel as well as understanding the function of various forms developed throughout the history of ceramics. Learn how to make functional work that you can use at home as foodware for yourself, friends, or family. This course is for students who have never worked with clay before and is the perfect introduction to wheel throwing. Section C Instructor: Justin Elue

Nov
10
2022

Wheel Throwing III (Advanced)

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Evanston

Wheel Throwing III is for students who have completed multiple intermediate sessions, and are ready for more independence as an artist. Students will be working on several larger projects that aim at discussing concept, meaning, and aesthetic. Students should expect to begin working on a portfolio that showcases their concepts clearly. This course aims to grow students' understanding of ceramics as art. Students will be involved in creating an environment for ceramic art practices to bloom. This course is for dedicated artists looking to expand their concepts. Students will begin a social media account where they will share their works in progress, making work videos, and final products. *Prerequisites: have taken a beginner’s wheel throwing class

Nov
11
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
11
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
11
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
11
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
11
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
11
2022

Symphonic Wind Ensemble

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Mallory Thompson, conductor; Jacob Nissly, guest percussion soloist A program of works evoking the natural and mechanical worlds. The wind arrangement of Adam Schoenberg’s percussion concerto Losing Earth, originally written for the San Francisco Symphony, was commissioned by Mallory Thompson and Northwestern’s Symphonic Wind Ensemble. This world premiere features Northwestern alumnus and San Francisco Symphony principal percussionist Jacob Nissly. Shuying Li’s The Last Hivemind and “Machine” from William Bolcom’s Symphony No. 5 reflect machines and humanity’s relationship to them. Warren Benson’s introspective The Leaves Are Falling was written as an expression of grief after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. It is based on Rilke’s poem “Autumn,” which includes the words “And in the nights the heavy earth is falling from all the stars down into loneliness.”

Nov
11
2022

Friday Nights at the Dearborn Observatory

8:00 PM - 10:00 PM, Evanston

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 8 to 10 pm during the fall and winter months (Oct-Mar). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope. To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/. For more information on the Dearborn Observatory, please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email Adrienne Mintz at adrienne.mintz@northwestern.edu or call 847-491-3685.

Nov
12
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
12
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
12
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
12
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
12
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
12
2022

Debra Richtmeyer Saxophone Master Class

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM, Evanston

Formerly principal saxophonist of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and the St. Louis Symphony, Bienen School alumna Debra Richtmeyer is professor of saxophone at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and has appeared as a soloist and clinician throughout North America, Europe, and Asia. She has performed or recorded as a concerto soloist with such ensembles as the Slovak Radio Orchestra, the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, and the United States Navy Band. In 2009 in Bangkok, she became the first woman to give a master class at the World Saxophone Congress.  Tickets are not required for this event.

Nov
12
2022

Northwestern University Symphony Orchestra

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

Donald Schleicher, guest music director; Luiz Venturelli de Souza, cello (Concerto/Aria Competition winner) W. A. Mozart, Overture to Le nozze di Figaro Sergei Prokofiev, Sinfonia Concertante in E Minor for cello and orchestra Paul Hindemith, Symphony: Mathis der Maler (Matthias the Painter) 

Nov
12
2022

University Chorale: Earth/Heaven

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Evanston

A. J. Keller, conductor; Eric Budzynski, organ  University Chorale’s first concert of the season explores the fluid boundaries between the sacred and the secular, culminating in a performance of Our Father, Leoš Janáček’s inspired setting of the Lord’s Prayer for chorus, organ, and harp. The program also features works by Heinrich Schütz, Caroline Shaw, Giovanni Gabrieli, William Byrd, Urmas Sisask, Ēriks Ešenvalds, and Judith Weir.  Tickets are not required for this event.

Nov
13
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
13
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
13
2022

Sunday Mass

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Nov
13
2022

Sunday Mass On Line

9:30 AM - 10:30 PM, Online

Each Sunday, the Mass at 9:30 a.m. CST is broadcast via livestream. Join us at sheilcatholiccenter.org/livestream. 

Nov
13
2022

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Suday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Nov
13
2022

LOOKING 101

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Learn to look in this dynamic space for teaching and learning through art. The average museum visitor spends less than 30 seconds looking at a work of art.  It usually takes us far less than that to draw conclusions about what we see; the human brain seems to perform this work automatically and instantaneously. How do we slow down our looking habits to better understand the process of meaning-making? How do our individual backgrounds and lived experiences affect how and what we see? We invite you to enter our teaching gallery and engage in a typical classroom activity: an exercise in close looking that can be used to analyze any work of art. We have intentionally not included contextual or interpretive texts on the walls of this exhibition so you can begin your visit with direct observation of the artworks. Information about each artwork and discussion prompts are available in the brochure holder and on our website. You can do this exercise on your own or in conversation with other visitors. This exhibition supports Northwestern University’s undergraduate curriculum with emphasis on first-year students. Works on view are from The Block’s collection and were selected in dialogue with faculty members across campus to relate to themes in their courses. Faculty members interested in learning more about the Block Teaching Gallery are encouraged to contact Essi Rönkkö at essi.ronkko@northwestern.edu. The exhibition will be open to general public when not scheduled for class use.

Nov
13
2022

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s – 1980s

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s explores mid-20th-century abstract art from North Africa, West Asia, and the Arab diaspora—a vast geographic expanse that encompasses diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. Comprising nearly 90 works by artists from countries including Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the exhibition is drawn from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation based in Sharjah, UAE. The paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints on view here reflect the wide range of nonfigurative art practices that flourishes in the Arab world over the course of four decades. Decolonization, the rise and fall of Arab nationalisms, socialism, rapid industrialization, wars and mass migrations, and the oil boom transformed the region during this period. With rising opposition to Western political and military involvement, many artists adopted critical viewpoints, striving to make art relevant to their own locales. New opportunities for international travel and the advent of circulating exhibitions sparked cultural-educational exchanges that exposed them to multiple modernisms—including various modes of abstraction—and led them to consider their roles within an international context. The featured artists—a varied group of Arab, Amazigh (Berber), Armenian, Circassian, Jewish, Persian, and Turkish descent—sought to localize and recontextualize existing 20th-century modernisms, some forming groups to address urgent issues. Moving away from figuration, they mined the expressive capacities of line, color, and texture. Inspired by Arabia calligraphy, geometry and mathematics, Islamic decorative patterns, and spiritual practices, they expanded abstraction’s vocabulary—thus complicating its genealogies or origin and altering how we view non-objective art. At its heart, Taking Shape raises a fundamental question: How do we study abstraction across different contexts, and what modes of analysis do we use? Looking critically at the history and historiography of mid-20th-century abstraction, the exhibition rethinks art-historical canons and expands the discourses around global modernisms.

Nov
13
2022

The Block Collects 2022

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

very year The Block brings new works of art into the collection to support Northwestern University’s teaching and learning mission. Each work becomes part of an expanding resource that students, faculty, and our wider public can engage with through classes, research visits, and exhibitions like this. Acquired by The Block over the past five years, these works build on strengths and expand perspectives represented in the collection. In Appendix 137_120 and Appendix 137_048, Walid Raad inserts patterns from abstract paintings by Lebanese artists Yvette Achkar (born 1928) and Huguette Caland (1931–2019) within spaces cut out from a representational illustration; other works by Achkar and Caland are included in Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s on view in the adjacent gallery. Works by Chicago artist Barbara Rossi and Argentinian artist Edgardo Giménez offer additional examples of mid-20th century abstraction. These prints share the space with photographic works including three by Japanese-American artist and biochemist Michael Koerner. His works were chosen by Northwestern undergraduate students in the Block Museum Student Associates Program as part of an ongoing commitment by The Block to student-led acquisitions.

Nov
13
2022

Concert Band

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Daniel J. Farris, conductor Talented students from across the Northwestern campus present a concert of band standards.

Nov
13
2022

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Sunday Masses 9:30am 11am 5pm

Nov
14
2022

Freedom For Everyone Slavery and Abolition in 19th Century America

All day, No Location

Juneteenth marks a momentous celebration — the end of American slavery — but it was not the end of the story about Black Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality. As Northwestern marks its first observance of the new federal holiday, we examine how deeply slavery was ingrained in 19th century America, how abolitionists forced a nation to face its inhumanity — and how that work must continue today. Juneteenth shows us that justice can prevail. But it must be fought for, even after it has been granted. Curated by Marquis Taylor, history PhD student. Materials are drawn from the Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections and University Archives; and the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies. On display in Deering Library as well as in an online exhibit.

Nov
14
2022

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka, An Exhibit by Trotter Alexander

All day, Evanston

The Story of Ka Makana o’ ka is an exhibit about a boy from Chicago going into a new world of Hawaii, experiencing numerous different lifestyles, vegetation, and people. Artist Trotter Alexander’s works addresses topics such as drug use, depression, infatuation, self-hate/love, racial identity, existentialism, and insanity.

Nov
14
2022

Exams and Quizzes

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This workshop will prepare instructors to create quizzes and exams in Canvas. Participants will learn about question types, question banks, quiz settings including time limits, and grading functions. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.