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Wellness Through Events

The Paw Print

Each week the Division of Student Affairs sends out The Paw Print, which will provide you with updates on key areas and events that you can engage in virtually. An archive of each week's announcement will be kept here

Look for the section of this newsletter called Physically Distant, Socially Connected where you will find weekly engagement opportunities to connect to your fellow Wildcats, Chicagoland, and the globe.
 
The division of student affairs is committed to maintaining current connections and establishing new ones as we remain physically apart. Although not in-person, we will continue to offer various programs for the community. You are invited to check your inbox for weekly engagement opportunities, and follow your favorite social media platforms for specific and departmental programs.
 
The Importance of Engaging for Your Wellness

Engaging in stimulating activities outside of the classroom is just as important to support your overall health and wellbeing as attending classes and studying for your exams. Northwestern provides an endless array of engaging events for little or no cost. These opportunities allow for connecting with new people and learning in a way you may not have otherwise.

Every event provides some way to foster an area of your wellbeing whether it’s a movie screening, speaker panel, sporting event, or even Dillo Day! Give yourself the time to enjoy these opportunities. It just may be what sends you on a new path you never could see before.

To see a full listing of Wellness events click here.

 

May
21
2021

2021 National LGBTQ Health Conference

All day, Online

The 2021 National LGBT Health Conference will be held virtually on May 20 – 21, 2021. The conference’s keynote and symposia focus on COVID-19 and anti-Black racism affecting the sexual and gender minority (SGM) community. A special symposium dedicated to community responses to COVID-19 will be organized by Howard Brown Health. A pre-conference session on April 13 at 12 pm CT will focus on using Twitter to broaden the networks of academics, community organizations, and clinical professionals working in LGBTQ health. Conference participants are encouraged to create a Twitter account (and use #NationalLGBTQHealthConference) to connect with other attendees during and after the conference. We are currently accepting abstract submissions through our online portal. The submission deadline is March 1, 2021. Registration details will be announced in early 2021. Please join our mailing list and visit the official conference website to ensure you receive the latest updates about the 2021 conference.

May
21
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
21
2021

Fulbright Application Workshop - Study/Research Awards

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Interested in pursuing research or study abroad? Attend a Zoom meeting to learn about the Fulbright application process at Northwestern. We will discuss application components and successful application strategies. You do not need a draft of your essays, but will benefit most if you have a clear vision of your project. Registration Required. Register here.

May
21
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

May
21
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
21
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
21
2021

Standing Above the Clouds Screening and Director Talk

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Online

Join MSA for a special screening of Standing Above the Clouds, a short documentary that follows Native Hawaiian mother-daughter activists as they stand to protect their sacred mountain Mauna Kea from the building of the world's largest telescope. After the screening, director Jalena Keane-Lee will join us for a discussion on the filmmaking process and theongoing  movement to protect the Mauna. This event is open to the entire Northwestern Community.

May
21
2021

Contemporary Music Ensemble

7:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Online

This performance will be presented as a live stream. Visit https://www.music.northwestern.edu/live after 7:20 p.m. CDT to view the performance. Ben Bolter, conductor/director Jessie Cox, Quantify Ruud Roelofsen, Memento Mori (world premiere) Alex Temple, The Man Who Hated Everything For its final concert of the season, the Contemporary Music Ensemble comes together in-person for the first time in over a year. The ensemble reprises Jessie Cox's Quantify, performed via remote live stream in March, and gives the world premiere of Bienen PhD composition student Ruud Roelofsen's Memento Mori. The program closes with Bienen alumna Alex Temple's The Man Who Hated Everything, a rollicking, genre-bending tribute to—and critique of—Frank Zappa that music critic George Wallace dubbed "a total blazing hoot." Joining the ensemble for Temple's work are singers from the Bienen Contemporary/Early Vocal Ensemble (BCE) and Ensemble Dal Niente guitarist Jesse Langen.

May
22
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
22
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
22
2021

Anime and Manga Drawing

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM, Online

In this course learn how to draw character faces and eyes, expressions bodies and basic proportions along with hands and feet. Drawings will flow into a story. *Supplies are included: 9X12 sketchbook, pencil, soft eraser, crayons, ultrafine sharpie

May
23
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
23
2021

Sunday Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

May
23
2021

NCA: Resume Party (+ Cover Letters)

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

Join NCA's Career Ambassadors (CAs) for our weekly Resume Parties. Similarly to our Live Chat, during the Resume Party undergraduate students will be able to meet 1:1 virtually with a CA to receive personalized feedback on resumes, and NEW this quarter - cover letters!  For more information, please login to Handshake.     

May
23
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
23
2021

Performance and Conversation with Tair Haim, Acclaimed Sololist of the band A-WA

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Online

ARAB-JEWISH CULTURE, IDENTITY, AND LANGUAGE - PAST AND PRESENT Performance and Conversation with Tair Haim, Acclaimed Soloist of the band A-WA  Tair Haim is a Yemenite Israeli singer and songwriter, and a founder of the internationally acclaimed group A-WA.  Moderator: Maayan Hilel, Postdoctoral Fellow in Israel Studies, Crown Family Center for Jewish and Israel Studies, Northwestern University  Third of five discussions and performances in the series Arab-Jewish Culture, Identity, and Language - Past and Present

May
23
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.  

May
23
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
23
2021

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
24
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
24
2021

NCA: For PhDs - Best Practices in Resume and Cover Letter Writing

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

This session is for PhD students to understand the difference between an academic CV and a resume for non-academic roles. Attendees will learn to re-frame scholarly experiences in terms of skills, and tailor documents to specific roles. We will also provide a brief overview of non-academic cover letter writing. For more information, please login to Handshake. 

May
24
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

May
24
2021

Introduction to Canvas

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

May
24
2021

Virtual International Classroom Partnering Grant Showcase

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM, Online

The Northwestern Roberta Buffett Institute for Global Affairs and the Office of the Vice President for International Relations are excited to announce the continuation of the International Classroom Partnering Grant for 2021-2022. The grant awards $3,000 to faculty whose projects offer cross-cultural, global opportunities for student learning and engagement with our institutional partners abroad. Join us on May 24 to learn more about creative co-teaching and global engagement during the COVID-19 period and beyond. This year’s grantees will showcase their diverse projects, share best practices for partnering with a colleague abroad, and reflect on student takeaways. Co-organized by the Northwestern Searle Center for Advancing Learning & Teaching. Featuring: Sarah Bartolome, Bienen School of Music Rifka Cook, Spanish & Portuguese, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences Elizabeth Hurd, Political Science, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences Fadia Antabli, Middle East and North African Languages, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences Candy Lee, Integrated Marketing Communications, Medill School of Journalism Licheng Gu, Asian Languages & Cultures, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences Kimberly Pusateri, Center for Communication and Health, School of Communication

May
24
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
24
2021

Latinx Community Gathering: Paint Night

6:00 PM - 7:00 PM, Online

Join MSA for a night of painting and community! At this Latinx Community Gathering, participants will be invited to paint something that they feel represents their cultural heritage. All registrants will receive a paint kit provided by ARTica Studios. Registrants can either pick-up the materials in person at ARTica Studios inside the Norris University Center beginning on May 14th, or provide shipping information and have it shipped to them. In order to adhere to shipping timelines, the deadline to register is Thursday, May 6th.

May
25
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
25
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

May
25
2021

Fulbright ETA Info Session: Teach English Abroad on a Fulbright after Graduation!

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

Fulbright English Teaching Assistants (ETAs) strengthen English language instruction in over eighty participating countries world-wide. Host institutions range from elementary and secondary schools to university-level language departments. Applicants may only apply to one country. Some countries require foreign language skills, others do not. The grant period corresponds to the academic year in the host country. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and hold an undergraduate degree by the time the fellowship begins. Many students apply just prior to the start of their senior year for awards beginning after graduation. Graduate students and alum are also eligible to apply.    Virtual Information Session – Registration Required

May
25
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
25
2021

HPA Speaker Series: Native & Indigenous Voices in Healthcare

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM, Online

HPA and MSA are thrilled to invite you to a conversation with Adrienne Schuler, an aspiring physician, and Coty Brayboy, a public health nurse consultant, where they will talk about their journeys into the health workforce as Native People. The voices of Native Americans and Indigenous Peoples are often missing at decision-making tables and, as a result, many of their needs remain unheard and unaddressed. We are excited for the opportunity to learn about their work and about the impact they are making on the many health disparities that disproportionately affect Native Peoples. Adrienne Schuler, MD Candidate (she/her) is a member of the Six Nations of the Grand River. She is a third-year medical student at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine. Coty Brayboy, MPH, BSN, RN (he/him) is an enrolled member of the Lumbee Tribe. He serves as a Public Health Nurse Consultant for the NC Communicable Disease Branch on the COVID-19 pandemic response team. In this role, Brayboy advocates for the health of NC’s eight tribes in collaboration with local, tribal and state partners. He is currently enrolled in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at East Carolina University. *Co-sponsored and hosted with Northwestern Multicultural Student Affairs (MSA)

May
26
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
26
2021

Undergraduate Research and Arts Exposition

8:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Online

The OUR Expo and Creative Arts Festival is less than a month away. Support our community of undergraduate researchers & learn about their projects and creative endeavors! This yearly event celebrates the amazing accomplishments and discoveries of Northwestern undergraduates with poster presentations, curated student panel talks, and a juried variety show of original works by NU students.   The Expo will be held in a virtual format. Poster and oral presentations, and the Creative Arts Festival, will be hosted via asynchronous platform over two days.   Wednesday, May 26, 8:30AM CST-Thursday, May 27, 5PM CST.

May
26
2021

Grading and Assignments in Canvas

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

In this workshop, you'll learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas Workshop.

May
26
2021

The Political Ecology of Native Presence, American Psyche, and John Muir

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

EDGS Graduate Lecture Series on Political Ecology Prof. Paul Robbins, Dean of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison The great naturalist and environmental advocate John Muir is well-known for his silence around the question of native peoples, even and especially those who were violently removed from the lands in and around the places he most revered. Yet his 1913 book, “The Story of My Boyhood and Youth,” is notable for its saturation with descriptions of native people and activity in the places around which the Muir family settled in Wisconsin in the 1840s, a little more than a decade after the violent conclusion of the Blackhawk War. Combining a close reading of the text with a psychoanalytic interpretation of this remarkable reversal reveals Muir’s repression of native memories, which parallel the larger American erasure that accompanied that era’s genocide. A Lacanian analysis, moreover, suggests that such repression is necessarily never complete, and tends to erupt in the form of repetitive compulsion, announcing itself repeatedly through the activities of conservation and the founding of the national parks system. Meaningful steps towards redressing historical inequity and violence, while advancing a more just model of conservation, require acknowledgment of this repression in Muir’s psyche and our own as settlers. This holds further implications for the role of the unconscious in political ecology more generally.

May
26
2021

Behold, Be Held: Considering Care and Community Through Art

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Join Block Museum 2020-2021 Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow and Behold, Be Held curator Rikki Byrd for a conversation on this exhibition, currently on view. In a year that has altered how we approach community, care, and art, Byrd will share the challenges and creativity that shaped her curatorial process. She will be joined in conversation by Allen Moore and Olivia Tsotsos, project leaders at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.), who will discuss the impact of this curatorial collaboration with Evanston high school students, and the role of art in fostering community conversations.

May
26
2021

Fulbright ETA Info Session: Teach English Abroad on a Fulbright after Graduation!

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Fulbright English Teaching Assistants (ETAs) strengthen English language instruction in over eighty participating countries world-wide. Host institutions range from elementary and secondary schools to university-level language departments. Applicants may only apply to one country. Some countries require foreign language skills, others do not. The grant period corresponds to the academic year in the host country. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and hold an undergraduate degree by the time the fellowship begins. Many students apply just prior to the start of their senior year for awards beginning after graduation. Graduate students and alum are also eligible to apply.    Virtual Information Session – Registration Required

May
26
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

May
26
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
26
2021

NSF GRFP, NDSEG, and Ford Predoctoral Fellowships Info Session

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM, Online

Interested in external funding for your graduate studies?  Join this info session to learn about the application process for three popular funding sources for early career graduate students:  NSF-GRFP, NDSEG, and the Ford Predoctoral Fellowship.  For questions, contact LaTanya Williams, Associate Director of STEM, Office of Fellowships, latanya.williams@northwestern.edu Registration required. Register here.  

May
26
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
26
2021

MPD2 Online Information Session

7:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Online

Lead the Future of Product Design and Development Join us for an online information session to learn how you can become a senior leader in creating advanced and ground-breaking new products with the Master of Product Design and Development Management at Northwestern (mpd2).

May
26
2021

VentureCat 2021

7:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Online

VentureCat is Northwestern’s annual student startup competition and celebrates the University’s most promising student founders. The program culminates in a pitch competition in which more than $300,000 in non-dilutive prize money is distributed to student ventures. Learn more about the 2021 semifinalists here. The VentureCat Public Showcase Livestream is open to the public and free to view. Audience members get to vote for their favorite finalist pitch to award an additional cash prize. Register to attend the livestream here. VentureCat is a collaborative program at Northwestern, supported by The Farley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, The Kellogg School of Management, the Donald Pritzker Entrepreneurship Law Center and The Garage. The program and non-dilutive prize money awarded to student ventures is made possible by generous sponsorship from the Levy Institute and Lanny and Sharon Martin.

May
27
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
27
2021

Undergraduate Research and Arts Exposition

8:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Online

The OUR Expo and Creative Arts Festival is less than a month away. Support our community of undergraduate researchers & learn about their projects and creative endeavors! This yearly event celebrates the amazing accomplishments and discoveries of Northwestern undergraduates with poster presentations, curated student panel talks, and a juried variety show of original works by NU students.   The Expo will be held in a virtual format. Poster and oral presentations, and the Creative Arts Festival, will be hosted via asynchronous platform over two days.   Wednesday, May 26, 8:30AM CST-Thursday, May 27, 5PM CST.

May
27
2021

Latinx Digital Media Virtual Seminar Series - Prof. Vanessa Díaz (Loyola Marymount University)

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Throughout the Spring Quarter, the Center for Latinx Digital Media invites you to a series of weekly seminars held over Zoom on Thursdays. You can now register (click here) to the seminar on Thursday, May 27, 2021 at 12-1 PM US CT, where Vanessa Díaz (Loyola Marymount University) will give a presentation entitled "Manufacturing celebrity: Latino paparazzi and women reporters in Hollywood."  Abstract: In Manufacturing Celebrity (Duke University Press, 2020) Vanessa Díaz traces the complex power dynamics of the reporting and paparazzi work that fuel contemporary Hollywood and American celebrity culture. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, her experience reporting for People magazine, and dozens of interviews with photographers, journalists, publicists, magazine editors, and celebrities, Díaz examines the racialized and gendered labor involved in manufacturing and selling relatable celebrity personas. Celebrity reporters, most of whom are white women, are expected to leverage their sexuality to generate coverage, which makes them vulnerable to sexual exploitation and assault. Meanwhile, the predominantly male Latino paparazzi can face life-threatening situations and endure vilification that echoes anti-immigrant rhetoric. In pointing out the precarity of those who hustle to make a living by generating the bulk of celebrity media, Díaz highlights the profound inequities of the systems that provide consumers with 24/7 coverage of their favorite stars.  Vanessa Díaz is a multimedia ethnographer and journalist whose work focuses on issues of race, gender, and labor in popular culture across the Americas. Grounded in her experience as a red carpet reporter for People magazine, Díaz’s first book Manufacturing Celebrity: Latino Paparazzi and Women Reporters in Hollywood focuses on hierarchies of labor as well as racial and gender politics in the production of celebrity-focused media. Díaz is a co-author of UCLA’s 2017 Hollywood Diversity Report, director of the film Cuban HipHop: Desde el Principio, and the media editor for Transforming Anthropology. Her research has been profiled in such outlets as the Atlantic, the Los Angeles Times, and NBC News. Díaz is an assistant professor in the Department of Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies at Loyola Marymount University. This event is co-sponsored by the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, the Buffett Institute for Global Affairs, the Center for Global Culture and Communication, the Department of Communication Studies, the Department of Radio/Television/Film, and the Latina and Latino Studies Program.

May
27
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

May
27
2021

Recognizing Collective Trauma: Supportive Space for Northwestern Staff and Faculty

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

CAPS, CARE, and Women’s Center invite the Northwestern staff and faculty to join us for a conversation on the collective trauma we have been experiencing for the past year. We will talk about how to understand trauma’s impact, manage its effects, and get support.   This session provides the same information offered in fall and winter events with the same name. However, it is now Part One of a two-part series.  Please see next week's Collective Healing for a unique processing space offered by CARE. The sessions are designed to be in coversation but attendance at both is not necessary.     

May
27
2021

Structural Racism in Kidney Health: A Transplant Surgeon's Perspective - Dinee Collings Simpson

12:00 PM - 12:45 PM, Online

The Master of Arts in Medical Humanities & Bioethics Presents A Montgomery Lecture With Dinee Collings Simpson, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery Director, African American Transplant Access Program Comprehensive Transplant Center Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Structural Racism in Kidney Health: A Transplant Surgeon's Perspective This talk will focus on Dr. Simpson’s journey in the health equity space and how she came to create the African American Transplant Access Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School. REGISTER HERE Read more about this series | Sign up for lecture announcements

May
27
2021

The Cancer & Aging IDEAS Labs: Exploration of Implementation and Process Outcomes from a Team Science Activity

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Registration required. This webinar is part of the Translational Applications in Public Health mini-series, which is a collaboration between the Institute for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM) and the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences (NUCATS) Institute. This presentation will explore the recent implementation of the Cancer and Aging IDEAS Lab, a Robert H. Lurie (RHL) Comprehensive Cancer Center initiative. We will provide a basic overview of the program and discuss the process evaluation outcomes following its recent completion. We will also contextualize the program using team science approaches and report on the successes and failures of implementation as a team science exercise. Guests: Guests: Bonnie Spring, PhD, ABPP Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry Behavioral Medicine Director & Co-Program Leader for Cancer Prevention Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine David Moskowitz, PhD Research Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Social Sciences Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine For more public health news, events, and announcements, visit the IPHAM website: https://feinberg.northwestern.edu/ipham

May
27
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
27
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
28
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
28
2021

JubilAsian APIDA Senior Send-off

All day, No Location

JubilAsian is an annual MSA event that celebrates the Asian, Pacific Islander, and Desi American (APIDA) community on campus as part of May’s APIDA Heritage Month. For JubilAsian 2021, we are piloting our first-ever Senior Send-off video in order to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of Northwestern's graduates of Asian, Pacific Islander, and/or Desi descent. Participant registration is closed.

May
28
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

May
28
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
28
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
29
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
29
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
30
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
30
2021

Sunday Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

May
30
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
30
2021

Arab-Jewish Intersecting Identities: Gender, Protest and Politics 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM, No Location

ARAB-JEWISH CULTURE, IDENTITY, AND LANGUAGE: PAST AND PRESENT Arab-Jewish Intersecting Identities: Gender, Protest and Politics  Guest Speakers: “The History of the Mizrahi Protest: A Chronicle Review and Lessons”  Henriette Dahan Kalev – Professor Emerita, founder of the Gender Studies Program, Ben- Gurion University of the Negev  “Jewish Women in Intercommunal Political Movements in Colonial Morocco”  Orit Ouaknine-Yekutieli – Lecturer, Department of Middle East Studies, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev  “In Journey for an Identity - When a Palestinian Refugee Discovered She is a Sephardi Jew”  Heba Nabil Iskandarani – Visiting Lecturer, Birmingham City University, UK  Chair: TBD  Fourth of five discussions and performances in the series Arab-Jewish Culture, Identity and Language - Past and Present

May
30
2021

Spring Festival Video Concert

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Online

Alice Millar Chapel Choir and soloists Baroque Music Ensemble Stephen Alltop, conductor Kyle Dickson, assistant conductor The Alice Millar Chapel Choir and Baroque Music Ensemble round out this eventful year with an exciting video concert. The program features the scintillating interplay of solo strings in Vivaldi's Concerto Grosso in D Minor, RV. 565; the majestic sonorities of horns and oboes in Telemann's Overture-Suite in D Major, TWV 55: D21; and Haydn's delightfully imaginative Symphony No. 27 in G Major. The Chapel Choir's offerings include settings of "All Creatures of Our God and King," "How Great Thou Art," and Rosephanye Powell's "The Word Was God." Music from Haydn's Great Organ Solo Mass, Hob. XXII:4 will bring the program to a joyous conclusion. A community video premiere will be held on Zoom on Sunday, May 30 at 11 a.m. CDT. After the premiere, the concert will be available for general viewing through June 30.  

May
30
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.  

May
30
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

May
30
2021

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
31
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

May
31
2021

Memorial Day Mass

9:00 AM - 9:30 AM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

May
31
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

Jun
1
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
1
2021

Exams and Quizzes for Remote Teaching

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

This workshop will prepare instructors to create quizzes and exams in Canvas. Participants will learn about question types, question banks, quiz settings including time limits, and grading functions. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Jun
1
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

Jun
1
2021

Social Protection and Inequality in a Pandemic: Evidence from Ghana

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Chris Udry: Robert E. and Emily King Professor, Department of Economics, Northwestern University Robert Darko Osei: Associate Professor in the Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER), University of Ghana, Legon; Vice Dean for the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Ghana. Free and open to the public. This webinar will be available through WebEx at this LINK. Please use the following passcode when accessing: 1234. The talk will begin at 12 p.m. CDT on Tuesday, June 1. This webinar is part of the Northwestern Buffett Institute for Global Affairs’ Building Sustainable Futures: Global Challenges and Possibilities series, which focuses on a different United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) each quarter with SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities being the focus of spring 2021.

Jun
1
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
2
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
2
2021

Collective Healing: Processing Space for Staff and Faculty

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

All staff and faulty are welcome to join CAPS and CARE for this unique processing space as we explore the impact of collective trauma on our bodies, relationships and well-being. In connection, we will strive to make meaning of this moment and begin a movement toward healing as a community. *Collective Healing is a follow up to Recognizing Collective Trauma (RTC) workshops, however, no prior participation in RTC is required to join this space.  To request this program for your community, email us at capsoutreach@northwestern.edu

Jun
2
2021

Fulbright Application Workshop - Study/Research Awards

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Interested in pursuing research or study abroad? Attend a Zoom meeting to learn about the Fulbright application process at Northwestern. We will discuss application components and successful application strategies. You do not need a draft of your essays, but will benefit most if you have a clear vision of your project. Registration Required. Register here.

Jun
2
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

Jun
2
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
2
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
3
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
3
2021

Dreaming Rivers, Weaving Collectives with filmmaker Judah Attille, Cairo Clarke, and han heung 한흥 恨興 media collective

All day, Online

Dreaming Rivers, Weaving Collectives presents a short film from the visionary collective Sankofa Film and Video. Filmmaker Judah Attille joins LUX curatorial fellow Cairo Clarke and members of han heung 한흥 恨興 media collective in an intergenerational dialogue with members of contemporary film and media collectives in the US and UK. The program was curated by the Feminist-in-Residence at Northwestern’s Women’s Center Hankyeol Song. Starting at 12 PM Central Time on June 3, Dreaming Rivers will stream for free on the Block’s Vimeo page for a period of three days. Please RSVP. About the program: Curated by Hankyeol Song, founder of han heung 한흥 恨興 media collective and feminist-in-residence at Northwestern Women’s Center, "Dreaming Rivers, Weaving Collectives" presents an intergenerational and transnational exploration of collective film workshops and the cultural politics of representation. Filmmaker Judah Attille will join LUX curatorial fellow Cairo Clarke and members of han heung in a recorded conversation about radical collective-building and resistance within and through media and cultural practice. Sankofa Film and Video Collective was founded by Judah Attille and her contemporaries following the 1981 Brixton riots in the UK, to make critical interventions into Eurocentric film theory and practice. han heung takes inspiration from Sankofa’s legacy to study, critique, and apply similar collective interventions to current moving image practice.   About the film: Dreaming Rivers (A Sankofa film directed by Martina Attille, 1988, UK, 30 min, English)Dreaming Rivers elaborates upon and transforms a discourse opened by Black UK film workshop Sankofa Film and Video Collective in their 1980s discussion series, “Black Women and Representation.” The three children of Miss T., a Black immigrant woman from the Caribbean, gather at her deathbed. The film figures their lives and identities in their late mother’s image, tracing fragmentation and difference across diasporic Black British subjectivities.  Dreaming Rivers appears courtesy of Women Make Movies. Co-presented by the Block Museum of Art with the Women’s Center at Northwestern University.

Jun
3
2021

Dreaming Rivers, Weaving Collectives - with Judah Attille (filmmaker), Cairo Clarke, and han heung 한흥 恨興 media collective

9:00 AM - 11:45 PM, Online

About the film Dreaming Rivers (1989) elaborates and transforms a discourse opened by Black UK film workshop Sankofa Film and Video Collective in their 1980’s discussion series, “Black Women and Representation”. The three children of Miss T., a Black migrant woman from the Caribbean, gather at her deathbed. The film figures their lives and identities in their late mother’s image, tracing fragmentation and difference across diasporic Black British subjectivities.   About the program Curated by Hankyeol Song, founder of han heung 한흥 恨興 media collective and feminist-in-residence at Northwestern Women’s Center, Dreaming Rivers, Weaving Collectives presents an intergenerational and transnational exploration of collective film workshops and the cultural politics of representation. Filmmaker Judah Attile will join LUX curatorial fellow Cairo Clarke and members of han heung in a post-screening conversation about radical collective-building and resistance within and through media and cultural practice. Sankofa Film and Video Collective was founded by Judah Attile and her contemporaries following the 1981 Brixton riots in the UK, to make critical interventions into Eurocentric film theory and practice. han heung takes inspiration from Sankofa’s legacy to study, critique, and apply similar collective interventions to current moving image practice.    the film and conversation will be available to stream through Block Cinema from June 3rd to June 6th.

Jun
3
2021

Hybrid Fulbright Application Workshop - Study/Research Awards

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

Interested in pursuing research or study abroad? Come learn about the Fulbright application process at Northwestern. We will discuss application components and successful application strategies. You do not need a draft of your essays, but will benefit most if you have a clear vision of your project. Attend in-person or through ZOOM.   Registration Required. Register here.

Jun
3
2021

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Jun
3
2021

Ebola and Structural Violence - Eugene Richardson & Paul Farmer - Health Across Borders Keynote Presentation

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Cosponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities, the Institute for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM), and the Institute for Global Health Studies EBOLA AND STRUCTURAL VIOLENCE Eugene Richardson, MD, PhD Assistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine; Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital Harvard Medical School Author of Epidemic Illusions: On the Coloniality of Global Public Health (2020) Paul Farmer, MD, PhD Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine Harvard Medical School Author of Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds: Ebola and the Ravages of History (2020) How do the specific histories and practices of global public health fundamentally shape the way epidemics unfold and inequality deepens? Our two physician-anthropologists speakers, Eugene Richardson and Paul Farmer, have engaged this question together over many years, working not only on the clinical frontlines of Ebola epidemics, but crafting analytic frameworks with which to make sense of those experiences. Join us as they draw on their respective new books to offer on-the-ground insights and critical tools for re-thinking the relationships—and lines of responsibility—between epidemics, inequality, and the field of public health. REGISTER This is the Keynote Presentation of the Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series June 3–July 8, 2021 • Thursdays 12-1pm • Online This year the Northwestern Bioethics & Medical Humanities annual conference will be held as a series of one-hour virtual sessions, spread over five weeks. The theme was chosen in 2019 to stimulate conversation around how borders, both geographic and conceptual, can establish inclusion and exclusion, unity and conflict—ideas that have taken on new dimensions and urgency in the past year. Following the keynote, each week will feature a three or four brief presentations on the theme or other current work in the field of bioethics and medical humanities. Read more about this conference series

Jun
3
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

Jun
3
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
3
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
4
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
4
2021

Dreaming Rivers, Weaving Collectives - with Judah Attille (filmmaker), Cairo Clarke, and han heung 한흥 恨興 media collective

9:00 AM - 11:45 PM, Online

About the film Dreaming Rivers (1989) elaborates and transforms a discourse opened by Black UK film workshop Sankofa Film and Video Collective in their 1980’s discussion series, “Black Women and Representation”. The three children of Miss T., a Black migrant woman from the Caribbean, gather at her deathbed. The film figures their lives and identities in their late mother’s image, tracing fragmentation and difference across diasporic Black British subjectivities.   About the program Curated by Hankyeol Song, founder of han heung 한흥 恨興 media collective and feminist-in-residence at Northwestern Women’s Center, Dreaming Rivers, Weaving Collectives presents an intergenerational and transnational exploration of collective film workshops and the cultural politics of representation. Filmmaker Judah Attile will join LUX curatorial fellow Cairo Clarke and members of han heung in a post-screening conversation about radical collective-building and resistance within and through media and cultural practice. Sankofa Film and Video Collective was founded by Judah Attile and her contemporaries following the 1981 Brixton riots in the UK, to make critical interventions into Eurocentric film theory and practice. han heung takes inspiration from Sankofa’s legacy to study, critique, and apply similar collective interventions to current moving image practice.    the film and conversation will be available to stream through Block Cinema from June 3rd to June 6th.

Jun
4
2021

2021 Keyman Conference: Queer Conditions | Kuir Haller I

9:30 AM - 1:30 PM, Online

2021 Conference: Queer Conditions/Kuir Haller: Social and Political Change in an Age of Authoritarianism Each year, the Keyman Modern Turkish Studies Program brings together scholars from around the world to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing Turkey from a global perspective. This year the conference’s focus will be on Queer and Gender Studies.  The primary aim of the conference is to engage with the global debate taking place on intersectionality.  More specifically, we are interested in analyzing the role of gender identity and dynamics in facilitating the reproduction of power structures, and in the mobilization of historically marginalized groups seeking to expose, challenge, and ultimately dismantle those structures.   By examining emergent forms of these justice-seeking struggles, the conference this year will direct the scholarly gaze on shifting relationships and opportunities for political action in a deeply polarized Turkey.  Feminist scholars of modernity have repeatedly revealed the gendered assumptions that underwrite the abstract citizen as the building block of society. By “sexing” the supposedly unmarked subjects and unmasking their socio-political conditions, we can productively interrogate the normative assumptions of other individuating axes of difference such as race, ethnicity, class and geography. By historicizing patriarchal heteronormativity, we can start to undermine its dominance in our readings of the past and shape current narratives of power.  Some of the questions we seek to answer are:  What are the conditions facing queer, feminist and other sexed subjects in contemporary Turkey? How did Turkey get to its current state after the Gezi protests that showed arguably the most intersectional politics in action in the country’s recent history? How could attending to these queer conditions help us approach the study of Turkey anew? At a time of profound transformation, framed by graduated authoritarianism and shrinking freedoms in the country, how could sexing the study of Turkey enrich our understanding of its history and its present? While the geographic focus will be on Turkey, we think of Turkey as a historical reference point, in geographically, culturally and ethnically flexible terms—and not Turkey as nation state with the attendant definition of Turkishness. We encourage further discussion with scholars who specialize in the study of Turkey’s contemporary diasporas and ethnic minorities, its broader Middle Eastern and Eastern European context, and other socially and politically cognate regions. Please register via Zoom: https://bit.ly/kuir-haller

Jun
4
2021

NCA Live Chat

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

NCA is pleased to offer live chat hours to connect with our team for quick career-related questions and guidance. For more information, visit NCA Live Chat.

Jun
4
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
4
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
5
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
5
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
6
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
6
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Jun
6
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
6
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
6
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
6
2021

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
6
2021

Portfolio: A Studio Recital Featuring Students of Patrice Michaels

7:00 PM - 8:15 PM, Online

This recital will be presented via Zoom. Register via the link to receive access to the recital. Vocalists Alexa Bartschat, Alexi Ortega Chavez, Andrew Pulver, Audrey Neace, Sabrina Chen, Lucy London, Daphne Meng, Carly Passer, Antonio Ruiz-Nokes, and Skye Tarshis Collaborative Pianists Jason Carlson and Shuyi Guan Guitarist Erica Cha This webinar-style presentation is a sampling of the year’s work in the studio of Patrice Michaels.  Each singer will introduce two selections from their repertoire (drawn from operatic and oratorio arias, art song, and Tin Pan Alley), recorded live from the Bienen School of Music.  Conversation to follow. The program includes music of Adams, Bernstein, Ellington, Hailstork, Handel, Purcell, Tchaikovsky, Barber, Bizet, Debussy, Falla, Mozart, Ravel, Schubert, and Sor.

Jun
7
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
7
2021

Fulbright Application Workshop - Study/Research Awards

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Interested in pursuing research or study abroad? Attend a Zoom meeting to learn about the Fulbright application process at Northwestern. We will discuss application components and successful application strategies. You do not need a draft of your essays, but will benefit most if you have a clear vision of your project. Registration Required. Register here.

Jun
7
2021

Recording Lectures Using Panopto

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview of fundamental Panopto features and demonstrates how to access and use Panopto through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to start recording their own videos or narrated presentations.

Jun
7
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
8
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
8
2021

Hybrid Fulbright Application Workshop - Study/Research Awards

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM, Evanston

Interested in pursuing research or study abroad? Come learn about the Fulbright application process at Northwestern. We will discuss application components and successful application strategies. You do not need a draft of your essays, but will benefit most if you have a clear vision of your project. Attend in-person or through ZOOM.   Registration Required. Register here.

Jun
8
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
9
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
9
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
9
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
9
2021

Postdoctoral Fellows Happy Hour

5:00 PM - 6:30 PM, No Location

A happy hour to meet and chat with other Northwestern postdoctoral fellows in the Humanities and Humanistic Social Sciences. If conditions allow, we will try for an in-person event, so please register so we can keep you updated.  Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/happy-hour-for-northwestern-postdocs-tickets-152404773781 Questions? Contact Tom Burke at thomas.burke@northwestern.edu.

Jun
10
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
10
2021

Panel #1 - Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The Center for Bioethics & Medical Humanities  Presents 

Health Across Borders:  Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series (June 3–July 8, 2021 • Thursdays 12-1pm • Online) This year the Northwestern Bioethics & Medical Humanities annual conference will be held as a series of one-hour virtual sessions, spread over five weeks. The theme was chosen in 2019 to stimulate conversation around how borders, both geographic and conceptual, can establish inclusion and exclusion, unity and conflict—ideas that have taken on new dimensions and urgency in the past year. Following the keynote, each week will feature a three or four brief presentations on the theme or other current work in the field of bioethics and medical humanities. Cosponsored by the Institute for Public Health and Medicine and the Program in Global Health Studies Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series Panel 1#  Meredith Yang Caregiver Depression and Early Childhood Development: A Mixed-Methods Study from Rural China Melissa Palma, MD, MPH ICAAP Refugee Immigrant Child Health Initiative: A Case Study in Patient Advocacy   Natalie Colaneri Western and Non-Western Aid Workers’ Perceptions of Refugee Mental Health and Well-Being in Greece   Courtney Furlough, MD Comparison of Ethical Decision-Making Climate Among Subspecialty ICUs at a Single Institution REGISTER Read more about this series | Sign up for lecture announcements

Jun
10
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
10
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
11
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
11
2021

2021 Keyman Conference: Queer Conditions | Kuir Haller II

9:30 AM - 1:30 PM, Online

2021 Conference: Queer Conditions/Kuir Haller: Social and Political Change in an Age of Authoritarianism Each year, the Keyman Modern Turkish Studies Program brings together scholars from around the world to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing Turkey from a global perspective. This year the conference’s focus will be on Queer and Gender Studies.  The primary aim of the conference is to engage with the global debate taking place on intersectionality.  More specifically, we are interested in analyzing the role of gender identity and dynamics in facilitating the reproduction of power structures, and in the mobilization of historically marginalized groups seeking to expose, challenge, and ultimately dismantle those structures.   By examining emergent forms of these justice-seeking struggles, the conference this year will direct the scholarly gaze on shifting relationships and opportunities for political action in a deeply polarized Turkey.  Feminist scholars of modernity have repeatedly revealed the gendered assumptions that underwrite the abstract citizen as the building block of society. By “sexing” the supposedly unmarked subjects and unmasking their socio-political conditions, we can productively interrogate the normative assumptions of other individuating axes of difference such as race, ethnicity, class and geography. By historicizing patriarchal heteronormativity, we can start to undermine its dominance in our readings of the past and shape current narratives of power.  Some of the questions we seek to answer are:  What are the conditions facing queer, feminist and other sexed subjects in contemporary Turkey? How did Turkey get to its current state after the Gezi protests that showed arguably the most intersectional politics in action in the country’s recent history? How could attending to these queer conditions help us approach the study of Turkey anew? At a time of profound transformation, framed by graduated authoritarianism and shrinking freedoms in the country, how could sexing the study of Turkey enrich our understanding of its history and its present? While the geographic focus will be on Turkey, we think of Turkey as a historical reference point, in geographically, culturally and ethnically flexible terms—and not Turkey as nation state with the attendant definition of Turkishness. We encourage further discussion with scholars who specialize in the study of Turkey’s contemporary diasporas and ethnic minorities, its broader Middle Eastern and Eastern European context, and other socially and politically cognate regions. Please register via Zoom: https://bit.ly/kuir-haller

Jun
11
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
11
2021

Daily Mass

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
12
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
12
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
12
2021

Graduation Mass for Evanston Campus Students

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

Graduation Mass  Saturday, June 12th at 5:00 pm Students, we look forward to celebrating your graduation with you!  Please limit attendance to yourself plus up to 2 family members or friends to help us ensure room for everyone who wants to attend. If you will be joined by family or friends, please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  All reservations must be made at least 1 day in advance to help our staff prepare for your attendance. Please visit our reopening webpage here to find important information about how to prepare for your visit.

Jun
13
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
13
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Jun
13
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
13
2021

Grads @ The Garage

10:00 AM - 3:00 PM, Evanston

Congratulations, class of 2021! Let's safely celebrate your accomplishments at Northwestern! Please join us at The Garage for a souvenir, individually wrapped cookie and make some memories in our very own photo booth! Of course, this is our chance to say "see you later!" Please plan to join us after your school specific commencement ceremony during the following dates / times: Sunday 6/13 10 AM - 3 PM Monday 6/14 12 PM - 5 PM In order to keep everyone safe and healthy, please: Order a "ticket" for each member in your party (friends and family welcome) so we can accurately estimate how many will be celebrating with us! Please order tickets for the day you will be attending. Wear a mask inside The Garage and maintain social distancing guidelines - even if you are vaccinated. This event is open to graduating Residents, Tinkerers, and other program participants at The Garage. 

Jun
13
2021

Performance and Conversation with Ziv Yehezkel, Renowned Israeli Singer and Composer

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM, Online

ARAB-JEWISH CULTURE, IDENTITY AND LANGUAGE -PAST AND PRESENT Performance and Conversation with Ziv Yehezkel, Renowned Israeli Singer and Composer  Ziv Yehezkel is an acclaimed Israeli singer and composer who sings in both Arabic and Hebrew. He is a unique multicultural performer of classical Arabic music.  Moderator: TBD  Fifth and closing event in a series on Arab-Jewish Culture, Identity and Language - Past and Present.

Jun
13
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
13
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
13
2021

Sunday Mass

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
14
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
14
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
14
2021

Grads @ The Garage

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Congratulations, class of 2021! Let's safely celebrate your accomplishments at Northwestern! Please join us at The Garage for a souvenir, individually wrapped cookie and make some memories in our very own photo booth! Of course, this is our chance to say "see you later!" Please plan to join us after your school specific commencement ceremony during the following dates / times: Sunday 6/13 10 AM - 3 PM Monday 6/14 12 PM - 5 PM In order to keep everyone safe and healthy, please: Order a "ticket" for each member in your party (friends and family welcome) so we can accurately estimate how many will be celebrating with us! Please order tickets for the day you will be attending. Wear a mask inside The Garage and maintain social distancing guidelines - even if you are vaccinated. This event is open to graduating Residents, Tinkerers, and other program participants at The Garage. 

Jun
15
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
15
2021

UN SDG Webinar #15

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

Nichole Denise Pinkard: Associate Professor, Learning Sciences, Northwestern University Free and open to the public. This webinar will be available through WebEx at this LINK. Please use the following passcode when accessing: 1234. The talk will begin at 12 p.m. CDT on Tuesday, June 15. This webinar is part of the Northwestern Buffett Institute for Global Affairs’ Building Sustainable Futures: Global Challenges and Possibilities series, which focuses on a different United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) each quarter with SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities being the focus of spring 2021.

Jun
16
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
16
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
16
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
16
2021

Panopto for Video Assignments

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview using Panopto to accept student video submissions through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to give students the instructions they need to create and submit video assignments. This session will also go over reviewing and grading video submissions.

Jun
17
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
17
2021

Panel #2 - Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The Center for Bioethics & Medical Humanities  Presents 

Health Across Borders:  Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series (June 3–July 8, 2021 • Thursdays 12-1pm • Online) This year the Northwestern Bioethics & Medical Humanities annual conference will be held as a series of one-hour virtual sessions, spread over five weeks. The theme was chosen in 2019 to stimulate conversation around how borders, both geographic and conceptual, can establish inclusion and exclusion, unity and conflict—ideas that have taken on new dimensions and urgency in the past year. Following the keynote, each week will feature a three or four brief presentations on the theme or other current work in the field of bioethics and medical humanities. Cosponsored by the Institute for Public Health and Medicine and the Program in Global Health Studies Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series Panel 2#  Elizabeth Bleed, MD, MA Coloring Outside the Lines: A Counter-narrative to the Hidden Curriculum Kathryn West, MA, LSW + Brian Callender, MD Graphic Medicine: Bridging the Chasm Between Patient & Provider Lauren Vassiliades, MD + Swati D Deshmukh, MD Imposter Syndrome: Is Medical Improv the Solution? Lauren Rissman, MD Prognostic Discussions with Parents of High Risk, Critically Ill Pediatric Patients REGISTER Read more about this series | Sign up for lecture announcements

Jun
17
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
18
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
18
2021

2021 Keyman Conference: Queer Conditions | Kuir Haller III & Roundtable

9:30 AM - 3:00 PM, Online

2021 Conference: Queer Conditions/Kuir Haller: Social and Political Change in an Age of Authoritarianism Each year, the Keyman Modern Turkish Studies Program brings together scholars from around the world to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing Turkey from a global perspective. This year the conference’s focus will be on Queer and Gender Studies.  The primary aim of the conference is to engage with the global debate taking place on intersectionality.  More specifically, we are interested in analyzing the role of gender identity and dynamics in facilitating the reproduction of power structures, and in the mobilization of historically marginalized groups seeking to expose, challenge, and ultimately dismantle those structures.   By examining emergent forms of these justice-seeking struggles, the conference this year will direct the scholarly gaze on shifting relationships and opportunities for political action in a deeply polarized Turkey.  Feminist scholars of modernity have repeatedly revealed the gendered assumptions that underwrite the abstract citizen as the building block of society. By “sexing” the supposedly unmarked subjects and unmasking their socio-political conditions, we can productively interrogate the normative assumptions of other individuating axes of difference such as race, ethnicity, class and geography. By historicizing patriarchal heteronormativity, we can start to undermine its dominance in our readings of the past and shape current narratives of power.  Some of the questions we seek to answer are:  What are the conditions facing queer, feminist and other sexed subjects in contemporary Turkey? How did Turkey get to its current state after the Gezi protests that showed arguably the most intersectional politics in action in the country’s recent history? How could attending to these queer conditions help us approach the study of Turkey anew? At a time of profound transformation, framed by graduated authoritarianism and shrinking freedoms in the country, how could sexing the study of Turkey enrich our understanding of its history and its present? While the geographic focus will be on Turkey, we think of Turkey as a historical reference point, in geographically, culturally and ethnically flexible terms—and not Turkey as nation state with the attendant definition of Turkishness. We encourage further discussion with scholars who specialize in the study of Turkey’s contemporary diasporas and ethnic minorities, its broader Middle Eastern and Eastern European context, and other socially and politically cognate regions. This day includes a 30 minute break between panel III and roundtable Please register via Zoom: https://bit.ly/kuir-haller

Jun
18
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
18
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
19
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
19
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
20
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
20
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Jun
20
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
20
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
20
2021

A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape: 2021 Art Theory and Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

“Following the credits, a boat glides down a thick, green river. Standing near the front of the boat is a woman in a long white dress and a large veiled hat. The image is familiar from dominant cinema's colonialism-as-entertainment genre. But we notice that this woman stands hipshot, chin cocked, one arm akimbo. These ebonics signify that filmmaker Dash has appropriated the image from reactionary cinema for an emancipatory purpose. She intends to heal our imperialized eyes.”  – Toni Cade Bambara, from the preface for Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film “How does a country look to the world? How does the world look to a country? And how can the landscape itself be said to have a perspective? Does this not suggest, quite literally, that the landscape looks back in some way at its beholders, returning their gaze with a blank, impassive stare, its face scarred with the traces of violence and destruction and (even more important) with the violent constructions that erupt on its surface?”– W. J. T. Mitchell, Holy Landscape: Israel, Palestine, and the American Wilderness  Let us gaze upon a scene that is meant to garner a presence of security.  Secure in upholding a false notion pertaining to an archive built on absent concepts. The pairing of a familiar melancholic midwestern landscape with the hermeneutics of a preserved view of Jerusalem, combine to complicate the focus of what actually is being seen, and the implications of a gaze that has been compromised in the process. Through video, sound, sculpture, and installation; This exhibition brings in questions of perception, scene and seen, and whether this gaze is one of warning or surveillance. A Bruising Gaze on a Faltering Landscape is the culminating thesis work of Shabtai Pinchevsky and Katherine Simóne Reynolds, candidates of the 2021 MFA degree program in Art, Theory and Practice, Northwestern University.   Shabtai PinchevskyShabtai Pinchevsky’s work is self-interrogation threaded into subjects of larger scale - the myths, landscapes, taboos, and images that form the foundations of identity and place in the country of his origin. Pinchevsky tackles the involvement of the photographic medium in the history of colonization in Palestine and the creation of the Zionist sense of place. He works from the standpoint, and in an effort to imply, that photography didn't only contribute to these colonial projects, but was also affected by the tasks it lent itself to. As a photographer, Pinchesvky challenges what is perceived to be native and naive in the images made by others and himself. In his works made outside of Israel, he addresses the local symptoms of his homeland, while connecting them with global phenomenon. Pinchevsky, born 1986 in London UK, has a BFA from the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. His project with photographer Miki Kratsman titled Anti-Mapping is currently on exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   Katherine Simóne ReynoldsKatherine Simóne Reynolds’ practice investigates emotional dialects and psychogeographies of Blackness within the “non”, and the importance of “anti-excellence”. Her work tries to physicalize emotions and experiences by constructing pieces that include portrait photography, video works, choreography, and sculpture. In the process of making subtle changes to her practice she has learned that creating an environment built on intention brings the most disarming feelings to her work. Utilizing Black embodiment and affect alongside her own personal narrative as a place of departure has made her question her own navigation of ownership, inclusion, and authenticity within a contemporary gaze. She draws inspiration from Black glamour while interrogating the notion of “authentic care”. Her practice generally deals in Blackness from her own perspective and she continuously searches for what it means to produce “Black Work”. Reynolds has exhibited and performed work within many spaces and institutions including the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Museum of Modern Art New York, The Luminary, and an upcoming solo exhibition at the Knockdown Center in Queens. She has exhibited in national and international group and solo shows, has spoken at The Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis and The Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Black Midwest Initiative Symposium at University of Minnesota. Curatorially she holds a position at The Luminary in Saint Louis, embarking on many projects including a triennial scaled to a neighborhood called Counterpublic and is the recent SculptureCenter In Practice fellow for 2021. EXHIBITION RESERVATIONSThis exhibition is open to the public with confirmed, time-entry reservations.   All visitors must follow the Northwestern University COVID-19 Guidelines, including wearing a mask at all times and maintaining social distancing.  In addition, all visitors, including those outside of the Northwestern community, are asked to display a “Cleared for Campus” screen on the Symptom Tracker website or application upon museum entry. Reservations are free and open to all but will be limited to parties of one or two individuals due to capacity restrictions in our gallery. (Non-Northwestern Visitors completing the Symptom Tracker please list sponsor email as block-museum@northwestern.edu and phone as 847.491.4000) MAKE EXHIBITION RESERVATION  

Jun
21
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
21
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
22
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
22
2021

Introduction to Canvas

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM, Online

Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Jun
23
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
23
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
24
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
24
2021

Panel #3 - Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The Center for Bioethics & Medical Humanities  Presents 

Health Across Borders:  Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series (June 3–July 8, 2021 • Thursdays 12-1pm • Online) This year the Northwestern Bioethics & Medical Humanities annual conference will be held as a series of one-hour virtual sessions, spread over five weeks. The theme was chosen in 2019 to stimulate conversation around how borders, both geographic and conceptual, can establish inclusion and exclusion, unity and conflict—ideas that have taken on new dimensions and urgency in the past year. Following the keynote, each week will feature a three or four brief presentations on the theme or other current work in the field of bioethics and medical humanities. Cosponsored by the Institute for Public Health and Medicine and the Program in Global Health Studies Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series Panel 3#  Sara Katsanis, MS DNA Testing at the U.S. Border Points: Potential Effects on Attitudes on Genomics David Ansari, PhD The Next Generation of Therapists: Enacting Inclusion in Mental Health Services for Refugees and Immigrants in Paris Erin Talati Paquette, MD, JD, MBe Provider Perspectives on Communication and Consent in Evaluations for Brain Death REGISTER Read more about this series | Sign up for lecture announcements

Jun
25
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
25
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
25
2021

A Space for Us

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM, Online

A Space for Us will meet over the summer months to center the experiences of Black Women and Nonbinary Staff, Graduate and Professional Students, and faculty from the Evanston and Chicago campuses and serve as an opportunity  to check in on each other, connect, share experiences, build community, and create strategies for navigating race and gender. Facilitated by Associate Director of the Women’s Center, Njoki Kamau & Senior Project Manager of Inclusive STEM Teaching Project, Dr. Veronica Womack.   Meets Monthly on the 4th Friday Starting June 25th July 23rd August 27th  

Jun
26
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
27
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
27
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Jun
27
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
27
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. All reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance to help our volunteer teams prepare for your visit. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name.  Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
28
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
28
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
29
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
30
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jun
30
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

We look forward to welcoming you to the Sheil Catholic Center for daily Mass. If you would like time for private prayer, the doors will open 15 minutes before Mass begins. Please make a separate reservation for every individual in each person's name, including children who need a seat. Please read the reopening guidelines and register here.

Jun
30
2021

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Jul
1
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
2
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
3
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
4
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
4
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Jul
5
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
6
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
7
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
8
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
8
2021

Panel #4 - Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Online

The Center for Bioethics & Medical Humanities  Presents 

Health Across Borders:  Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series (June 3–July 8, 2021 • Thursdays 12-1pm • Online) This year the Northwestern Bioethics & Medical Humanities annual conference will be held as a series of one-hour virtual sessions, spread over five weeks. The theme was chosen in 2019 to stimulate conversation around how borders, both geographic and conceptual, can establish inclusion and exclusion, unity and conflict—ideas that have taken on new dimensions and urgency in the past year. Following the keynote, each week will feature a three or four brief presentations on the theme or other current work in the field of bioethics and medical humanities. Cosponsored by the Institute for Public Health and Medicine and the Program in Global Health Studies Health Across Borders: Bioethics & Medical Humanities Conference Series Panel 4#  Martin Hill Indicators Likely to Contribute to Clinical and Functional Improvement Among Survivors of Politically Sanctioned Torture Alexandra Tarzikhan, JD, MPH The Human Rights of Mobile Populations Affected by TB Jenifer Cartland, PhD Addressing Barriers to Special Education for Children by Enabling Collaboration Between Schools and Health Care Providers REGISTER Read more about this series | Sign up for lecture announcements

Jul
8
2021

Grading and Assignments in Canvas

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

In this workshop, you'll learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Jul
9
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
10
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
11
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
11
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Jul
12
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
13
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
13
2021

Recording Lectures Using Panopto

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview of fundamental Panopto features and demonstrates how to access and use Panopto through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to start recording their own videos or narrated presentations.

Jul
14
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
15
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
16
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
17
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
18
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
18
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Jul
19
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Jul
19
2021

Introduction to Canvas

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Jul
20
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/