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Wellness Through Events

The Paw Print

Each week the Division of Student Affairs sends out The Paw Print, which will provide you with updates on key areas and events that you can engage in virtually. An archive of each week's announcement will be kept here

Look for the section of this newsletter called Physically Distant, Socially Connected where you will find weekly engagement opportunities to connect to your fellow Wildcats, Chicagoland, and the globe.
 
The division of student affairs is committed to maintaining current connections and establishing new ones as we remain physically apart. Although not in-person, we will continue to offer various programs for the community. You are invited to check your inbox for weekly engagement opportunities, and follow your favorite social media platforms for specific and departmental programs.
 
The Importance of Engaging for Your Wellness

Engaging in stimulating activities outside of the classroom is just as important to support your overall health and wellbeing as attending classes and studying for your exams. Northwestern provides an endless array of engaging events for little or no cost. These opportunities allow for connecting with new people and learning in a way you may not have otherwise.

Every event provides some way to foster an area of your wellbeing whether it’s a movie screening, speaker panel, sporting event, or even Dillo Day! Give yourself the time to enjoy these opportunities. It just may be what sends you on a new path you never could see before.

To see a full listing of Wellness events click here.

 

Aug
5
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
6
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
6
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
7
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
8
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
8
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Aug
8
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.      

Aug
8
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Join us for Sunday Mass in person at the Sheil Catholic Center. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.

Aug
9
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
9
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
10
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
11
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
11
2021

Intro to Behavioral Interviewing (For PhDs)

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

This is the last workshop in an eight-part career exploration series for PhD students. This workshop focuses on how to prepare for behavioral interview questions & stand out as a candidate across all industries of interest.  For more information, please login to Handshake. 

Aug
11
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
12
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
12
2021

Grading and Assignments in Canvas

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

Learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas Prerequisite: Intro to Canvas Workshop  

Aug
13
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
13
2021

Adding SIGP to Your Resume

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Online

NCA Career Adviser, Melissa Goethals, will provide SIGP recipients with tips and guidance to add your summer experience to your resume & discuss it with future employers.  For more information, please login to Handshake. 

Aug
13
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
14
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
15
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
15
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Aug
15
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.      

Aug
15
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Join us for Sunday Mass in person at the Sheil Catholic Center. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.

Aug
16
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
16
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
16
2021

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Aug
17
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
17
2021

Creating Your Law School List

6:00 PM - 6:30 PM, Online

Join NCA's Prelaw Adviser, Lynn Page, to learn how to research law schools, find ones that fit your academic profile and interests, and crafting a solid list of reach, target and safety schools to apply to. For more information, please login to Handshake. 

Aug
18
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
18
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
19
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
19
2021

Recording Lectures Using Panopto

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Online

Learn to create pre-recorded video content using Panopto and share it with your students. This session offers instructors an overview of fundamental Panopto features and demonstrates how to access and use Panopto through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to start recording their own videos or narrated presentations.

Aug
19
2021

PhD to Professional: Networking Finale for Summer Career Series

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Online

Join the Center for Civic Engagement and Northwestern Career Advancement for a panel and breakout conversations with doctoral alumni pursuing careers oriented to the public good - at both non-profit and for-profit institutions. For more information, please login to Handshake. 

Aug
20
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
20
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
21
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
22
2021

Behold, Be Held

All day, Evanston

“And I know what it’s like to behold and not be held.” – Moses Sumney, Lyrics from his song Plastic (2014) In Fall 2020, as our galleries remained closed to visitors due to the pandemic, we challenged ourselves to think imaginatively about engaging visitors through our permanent collection. While the past year has altered so much in our lives, it has also highlighted how art remains a vital window into our feelings and experiences. Behold, Be Held uses the facades of The Block, the neighboring Ethel M. Barber Theater, and the building of our community partner Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) as an outdoor gallery. Reproductions of artworks from the Block Museum collection invite visitors to reflect on how art holds us through moments of crisis. These works capture gestures that we may have taken for granted prior to the pandemic, but we have missed dearly. The selection of works was guided by themes of self-care, self-authorship, and community. It also explores how subtle moments with others prepare and carry us on our journeys. Within these works, people hold each other through life changes, create spaces of sustenance, and raise their hands to declare “I am still here.” Behold, Be Held is a meditation and a prompt, asking: What are you most in need of right now? Behold, Be Held is curated by the 2020–21 Block Museum of Art Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow, Rikki Byrd (PhD candidate, African American Studies). It has been developed in partnership with The Leadership Project at Youth and Opportunity United (Y.O.U.) in Evanston, IL, with the participation of: Malik Agee, Cherie Animashaun, Saliha Ansari, Isabel Horek Gualtier, Michia Kenderick, Aaliyah Knox, Jocelyn Maldonado, Ciara Nicole Phillips-Gentle, McKenzie Royal, James Thoussaint, Mia Williams, Nia Williams. Generous support has been provided by the Northwestern Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts; the Black Arts Consortium; the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; and The Graduate School, Northwestern University. #BeholdBeHeld https://beholdbeheld.org/

Aug
22
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Aug
22
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.      

Aug
22
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Join us for Sunday Mass in person at the Sheil Catholic Center. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.

Aug
23
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
23
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
24
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
25
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
25
2021

Introduction to Canvas

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM, Online

Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Aug
25
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
25
2021

Jumpstart 2021 Demo Day

4:00 PM - 4:45 PM, Online

The Garage’s pre-accelerator program, Jumpstart (formerly known as Wildfire), is hosting its end-of-program Demo Day virtually August 25! Tune in live at thegarage.nu/demoday The top five Jumpstart teams will showcase and pitch their startups to an audience of Northwestern students, faculty, mentors and partners for a prize pool of $10,000 of non-dilutive capital. Be sure to tune in LIVE so you can cast your vote for an Audience Favorite Prize!

Aug
26
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
27
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
27
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
28
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
29
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
29
2021

Mass via YouTube

All day, Evanston

Join the Sheil Catholic community for Mass every Sunday during the pandemic. Each Sunday, the Mass is posted to the YouTube channel and you can watch and participate at a time convenient for you. Subscribe to the Sheil YouTube channel here.

Aug
29
2021

Sunday Mass

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, Evanston

We are excited to welcome you to Sheil Catholic Center for Sunday Mass. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.      

Aug
29
2021

Sunday Mass

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Evanston

Join us for Sunday Mass in person at the Sheil Catholic Center. Sunday Mass is offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 5 p.m. during the academic year and at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. during the summer months (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021).  ReservationsStarting June 20th, you only need to make a reservation if you would like to reserve a space in our social-distance seating section. You may make that reservation online reservation system.

Aug
30
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Aug
30
2021

Daily Mass

12:00 PM - 12:30 PM, Evanston

Daily Mass Join us for daily Mass at the Sheil Catholic Center chapel during the academic year on weekdays at 5 p.m.  During the summer (June 13th, 2021-September 19, 2021), daily Mass is celebrated on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Noon when a priest is available. To see if Mass will be celebrated, see our events page here.

Aug
30
2021

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Aug
31
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
1
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
2
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
2
2021

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Sep
3
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
4
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
5
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
6
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
7
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
7
2021

Introduction to Canvas for Northwestern Instructors

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM, Online

Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.

Sep
8
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
9
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
9
2021

Grading and Assignments in Canvas

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

In this workshop, you'll learn how to create assignments, give feedback, and assign grades in Canvas. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Sep
10
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
11
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
12
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
13
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
14
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
15
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
15
2021

Exams and Quizzes for Remote Teaching

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This workshop will prepare instructors to create quizzes and exams in Canvas. Participants will learn about question types, question banks, quiz settings including time limits, and grading functions. Participants in this workshop should already be familiar with the features and functionality of Canvas by completing the Introduction to Canvas workshop.

Sep
16
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
17
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
17
2021

Norris at Night

9:00 PM - 11:30 PM, Evanston

It is Back this September.  Norris will Welcome the Class of 2025 with lots of free food sampling, lots of swag, activities, live entertainment and amazing prizes.  The fun will begin at 9p.m.  Students may pre-register for the prize drawing online.  Norris at Night is one of the most memorable and fun nights on campus, not to be missed!

Sep
18
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
19
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
20
2021

Fall Norris Mini Course Registration

All day, Evanston

Register NOW and Save $10 off 4-6 week in-person courses.  Fall Registration begins Monday August 23.   The program will  offer in-person and virtual courses.   Don't delay, in-person courses will have a lower maximum capacity.  Currently masks are required for non-vaccinated students and the program encourages  but not requires vaccinated students to wear a mask.  For more information visit the Mini Course Website.  Take a Mini Course and learn something new.  Special $10 saving ends Tuesday September 20, after this deadline you pay the regular fee.  Most Fall Classes will begin in October.  

Sep
20
2021

Recording Lectures Using Panopto

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview of fundamental Panopto features and demonstrates how to access and use Panopto through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to start recording their own videos or narrated presentations.

Sep
22
2021

Panopto for Video Assignments

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM, Online

This session offers instructors an overview using Panopto to accept student video submissions through Canvas. Attendees will leave ready to give students the instructions they need to create and submit video assignments. This session will also go over reviewing and grading video submissions.

Sep
22
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Sep
22
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Sep
23
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Sep
23
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Sep
24
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Sep
24
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Sep
25
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Sep
25
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Sep
26
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Sep
26
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Sep
28
2021

Feminist First Year

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM, Evanston

Feminist First Year is an opportunity for students *new to campus to learn about feminist student organiuzations, meet staff from important sites of support on campus, mingle, and make art for their living spaces. We will have light refreshments and weather permitting will have most of our activities outdoors on the lawn at 2000 Sheridan.    *starting in 2020 or 2021 as freshmen or transfers.

Sep
29
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Sep
29
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Sep
29
2021

Introduction to Zoom for Instructors

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM, Online

This virtual session will allow instructors to get hands-on experience using Zoom. An overview of Zoom, its features, and its Canvas integration will be provided. Attendees will then be able to offer additional questions and try out various features while in the session.

Sep
30
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Sep
30
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Sep
30
2021

Feminist First Year

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM, Evanston

Feminist First Year is an opportunity for students *new to campus to learn about feminist student organiuzations, meet staff from important sites of support on campus, mingle, and make art for their living spaces. We will have light refreshments and weather permitting will have most of our activities outdoors on the lawn at 2000 Sheridan.    *starting in 2020 or 2021 as freshmen or transfers.

Oct
1
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Oct
1
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Oct
2
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Oct
2
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Oct
3
2021

Sky Hopinka: Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

Cloudless Blue Egress of Summer, a two-channel video installation by the artist Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga, born 1984, Ferndale, WA), offers an immersive and elusive reckoning with histories of colonial violence and Indigenous resistance. The thirteen-minute work examines the history of the Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest fort in the continental United States. Finished in 1695, the structure was known as Fort Marion when it held Native Americans captive throughout the Seminole Wars of the 19th century. In the 1870s, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Arapaho, and Caddo Indian prisoners were transported to the fort, where prison supervisor Richard Henry Pratt developed educational techniques designed to “Americanize” his captives. The U.S. boarding school system that grew out of these experiments imposed a regime of compulsory assimilation on generations of Indigenous children, a practice of cultural genocide that intentionally divided families and deprived communities of their linguistic and cultural heritage. Hopinka juxtaposes his own footage of the fort, now a national monument and museum, with images from an archive of prisoners’ ledger drawings, which depict Native life and Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains, Canadian Prairies, Northwest Plateau and Great Basin in ledger books commonly available from the 1860s to the 1920s. Texts also appear on screen and in the video’s accompanying soundtrack. One of the most striking accounts describes a daring prison escape drawn from the recollections of Seminole Chief Coacoochee, whose captivity at the fort in 1837 ended when he and nineteen other Seminole captives fasted for days in order to slip through the bars of their cells. As strands of sound, text, and image intersect across the two screens, Hopinka plays with the friction between them, asking the viewer to absorb narratives that evade the conventions of linear history. These juxtapositions expose the challenge of reconstructing the past from the incomplete fragments left behind in the archives of the colonizer. While pointedly addressing a traumatic legacy, Hopinka also uses the expressive possibilities of the digital image to open up new spaces of historical imagination, where unjust edifices dissolve to expose glimpses of breathtaking beauty and tranquility across an expansive canvas. About the artist Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and a descendant of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. In 2019 he was a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the Sundance Institute. His work has been featured in festivals and exhibitions at the ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, LACE, the Whitney Biennial, and the Front Triennial. Hopkina studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. He received his BA from Portland State Uiversity in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He currently serves as the assistant professor in film production at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C.

Oct
3
2021

Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection

12:00 PM - 5:00 PM, Evanston

How do artists, artworks, and museums shape and challenge our understanding of the past? In 2020-2021 Northwestern University’s Block Museum of Art celebrates its 40th anniversary. Leading up to this milestone, The Block introduced a major initiative to acquire works of art that encourage critical thinking about the representation of history. This initiative and The Block’s anniversary celebration culminates with Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts: Thinking about History with The Block’s Collection, an exhibition inviting visitors to think critically about how artists, artworks, and museums engage with narratives of the past. Highlighting more than eighty modern and contemporary artworks recently acquired by The Block Museum of Art, the exhibition considers our constantly changing understanding of the past through the lens of artistic practice. It features works by a wide-ranging selection of artists exploring the idea of history, such as Dawoud Bey, Shan Goshorn, the Guerrilla Girls, Louise Lawler, Kerry James Marshall, Catherine Opie, Walid Raad, Man Ray, Edward Steichen, and Kara Walker.  The exhibition borrows its title and an entry point from a work in The Block’s collection by conceptual artist Louise Lawler, Who Says, Who Shows, Who Counts (1990), which draws attention to barriers that exist within the art world. Organized around challenging questions of historical representation within artworks and institutions, the exhibition asks: • How can art help us reflect upon, question, rewrite, or reimagine the past?• Who has been represented in visual art, how, and by whom?• How is history etched onto a landscape or erased from it?• How do museums and galleries shape our view of the past? An accompanying publication deepens the exhibition’s exploration of The Block’s collection. Showcasing the depth and breadth of recent acquisitions, more than fifty short essays reflect the perspectives of over twenty different academic units. Further essays illustrate the museum's commitment to collecting works of art that connect to Northwestern's broad curriculum and deepen representation of global modern and contemporary culture from multiple perspectives. Including voices from students, alumni, faculty, and staff, Who Says, Who Shows, What Counts invites visitors to reflect on the ways in which art can facilitate multidisciplinary connections, ask challenging questions, and tell stories about issues relevant to our lives. Curated by Essi Rönkkö, Associate Curator of Collections and Kate Hadley Toftness, Senior Advancement Manager, Grants and Collection Council. This exhibition is supported by the Alumnae of Northwestern University, the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, and the Mary and Leigh Block Endowment.

Oct
4
2021

Introduction to Canvas

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM, Online

Build your Canvas course with confidence! This workshop provides an overview of the basic features, dynamic tools, and functionality of Canvas to allow you to build and support engaging courses.