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The Alumnae Award for Curriculum Development

The Alumnae of Northwestern University Award for Curriculum Development is intended to support faculty work over the summer to develop new course materials, new courses, or new modes of teaching (including online courses or online education), that will enhance innovation in our undergraduate curriculum.

Each Curriculum Development Award recipient will have the opportunity to address a meeting of the Board of Directors of The Alumnae of Northwestern University and to present the outcomes of their project at the annual TEACHx promoting experiments in teaching and learning forum. In addition, Provost Holloway will recognize recipients of the Curriculum Awards at the annual luncheon he hosts for all current recipients of awards established by the Alumnae of Northwestern University.

Read more about the most recent recipients of the Alumnae of Northwestern University’s Award for Curriculum Development in the University announcement.

For additional questions about the Alumnae Curriculum Awards, please contact Lee West, Director of Undergraduate Education at leewest@northwestern.edu.

Congratulations to the 2019 Recipients

Megan Bang

Megan Bang

Professor, Learning Sciences, School of Education and Social Policy

“Hybrid Courses: A New Model for Community-Engaged Undergraduate Courses”

Vossoughi and Bang will develop a model for hybrid courses bringing together Northwestern students with young people and community members outside the university to engage in courses of study together. Their award will fund the development of a pilot course for Northwestern undergraduates and students at Evanston Township High School (ETHS) with a focus on social justice, including an innovative apprenticeship in community-based research. “Students will be supported to examine histories of educational inequity at local, national and global scales as well as various efforts to transform education to serve community agency and self-determination.”  

Core learning objectives include developing young people as critical and global thinkers who will pursue a deep study of social and educational problems of concern with an eye towards meaningfully blending research, theory and social action. The curriculum design will enable students as writers to move beyond summarizing key arguments within course texts, towards engaging in evidence- based analysis and argumentation, and as researchers to think deeply about questions of ethics, positionality, partnership, study design, data collection and analysis. With an emphasis on evidence-based analysis and argumentation, the course will foster the development of students as publicly engaged scholars and writers.

James Hambleton

James Hambleton

Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering

“Inspiring First-Year Engineering Students to Enjoy Basic Mechanics”

 

Hambleton will create a new teaching module that supports and enhances an existing first-year engineering course and will introduce experiential learning activities aimed at improving student engagement and performance. Drawing from his own research on how soils are moved and shaped through interaction with man-made objects, Hambleton will have student teams design and build a “boring machine” which will be tested in the new Soil-Structure and Soil-Machine Interaction Laboratory. In developing their own designs, students “will be encouraged to look at bio-inspired machine designs, examining how worms, insects, clams, and plant roots burrow through soil.”  In a second group activity, students will design, build, and test a 3D-printed truss, making use of 3D printers in on-campus maker spaces.  Both activities will culminate in competitions between the student teams, with prizes awarded to the best-performing models and those employing the most innovative design concepts.

Hambleton conceived of the course as a way to address the range of prior experience students bring to the course. Studies demonstrate hands-on learning can be instrumental in retaining engineering students, and first-year engineering students who are less prepared in math and physics will be especially targeted for this new course.
Shirin Vossoughi

Shirin Vossoughi

Assistant Professor, Learning Sciences, School of Education and Social Policy

“Hybrid Courses: A New Model for Community-Engaged Undergraduate Courses”

Vossoughi and Bang will develop a model for hybrid courses bringing together Northwestern students with young people and community members outside the university to engage in courses of study together. Their award will fund the development of a pilot course for Northwestern undergraduates and students at Evanston Township High School (ETHS) with a focus on social justice, including an innovative apprenticeship in community-based research. “Students will be supported to examine histories of educational inequity at local, national and global scales as well as various efforts to transform education to serve community agency and self-determination.”  

Core learning objectives include developing young people as critical and global thinkers who will pursue a deep study of social and educational problems of concern with an eye towards meaningfully blending research, theory and social action. The curriculum design will enable students as writers to move beyond summarizing key arguments within course texts, towards engaging in evidence- based analysis and argumentation, and as researchers to think deeply about questions of ethics, positionality, partnership, study design, data collection and analysis. With an emphasis on evidence-based analysis and argumentation, the course will foster the development of students as publicly engaged scholars and writers.