Skip to main content
Northwestern University

Past Recipients

2016 Alumnae Curriculum Award Winners

Ryan Dohoney

Assistant Professor of Musicology, Bienen School of Music

"Experimental Music in Theory and Practice"

His proposal, "Experimental Music in Theory and Practice," will help students to discover U.S. and European experimental traditions in music as both scholars and performers, allowing them to learn from Chicago's contemporary musical community and from archived works in Northwestern's Deering Library.

Dohoney has noticed a shift in the current musical landscape. He hopes that his new course will help build a sustainable curriculum that supports the vision of the Bienen Institute for New Music, in addition to helping build a foundation for students' future musical ventures.

Mary Weismantel

Professor of Anthropology, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

"Art of the Ancient Americas"

Mary's proposal, "Art of the Ancient Americas," will introduce students to the deep cultural heritage of the Americas through their connection to modern art and architecture, in addition to allowing them to conntect with an image-based syllabus rather than relying mainly on text.

She is eager to respond to student requests for Native American/indigenous studies courses. She also is hopeful that her class will “validate the cultural heritage of many of our students of color, and [give] students from European, Asian and other backgrounds a basic familiarity with Latino, Latin American and Native American culture and history.”

2015 Alumnae Curriculum Award Winners

Susie Phillips

Associate Professor, English, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

and

Indira Raman

Professor, Neurobiology, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

“Thought Experiments: An Exploration of Knowing Through Neuroscience and the Humanities"

Their proposal, “Thought Experiments: An Exploration of Knowing Through Neuroscience and the Humanities," will seek to understand the human experience by merging neuroscientific, literary and artistic perspectives -- disciplines generally thought to be at opposite ends of the academic spectrum.

In this truly multidisciplinary course, student will read works like Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury” alongside scientific writing on neurophysiology, neuropyschiatric disorders and animal behavior. Throught, they will explore different perspectives on what constitutes thought, what free will is and isn’t, and what tools we have for making sense of some of the most fundamental aspects of human experience -- emotions, memory, perception, ethics and knowledge.

Francesca Tataranni

Senior Lecturer, Classics and Director of Latin Instruction, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

"Ancient Rome in Chicago"

Her proposal, "Ancient Rome in Chicago," will focus on the legacy of ancient Rome as reflected in the architecture, art and other forms of cultural production in Chicago.

Students will work on individual projects and present their research in the form of a video essay. Using software designed by Northwestern’s Knight News Innovation Laboratory, the entire class will then work jointly to design a virtual walking tour of all the places in the city where “memories” of ancient Rome appear.

“We see or walk by neoclassical buildings and are exposed to a variety of uses of classical imagery almost every day, which we completely take for granted,” Tataranni said. “Specifically, the focus of the class will be Chicago, the quintessential modern American city, and the way it has used classical antiquity, in particular Roman culture, to assert its own modernity.”

Eric Zaslow

Professor, Mathematics, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

"Quantitative Reasoning"
Zaslow's course proposal, "Quantitative Reasoning," which will be developed as part of the Bridge Program, a residential five-week program that provides intensive instruction in pre-calculus mathematics and chemistry.

Through this course, students will learn to apply quantitative skills to a wide range of topics and problems that will not only help them succeed in future courses at the University but also in everyday, real-world situations. Course topics might cover, for instance, how to compute compound interest, assessing the value of a college degree, estimating the cost/benefit of undocumented workers and deciding whether health insurance is worth the expense.

The course will develop a student's ability to "argue with numbers,” Zaslow said. “They will apply basic mathematical skills in making reasoned, quantitative arguments to address questions from a variety of real-world concerns and a host of academic disciplines.”

2014 Alumnae Curriculum Award Winners

Elizabeth Gerber

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the Allen K. and Johnnie Cordell Breed Junior Professor of Design, McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science

“A Crowdsourcing Curriculum to Enhance Entrepreneurship Education”

Gerber's  highly innovative curriculum is designed to teach the next generation of entrepreneurs how to effectively leverage crowdfunding, a relatively new and nontraditional way of obtaining capital.  The process has made it possible for novice entrepreneurs with limited access to traditional financial backing from banks or venture capitalists to launch new ventures on their own.

“The ability to communicate a new service or product in an online pitch video is vital for successful crowdfunding,” Gerber said in her proposal. “Our curriculum will teach the design and production of pitch videos for crowdfunding campaigns by providing seven online mini-lectures and activities.”

Gerber believes that the self-directed curriculum will be extremely useful to engineering and business students who are attracted to entrepreneurship education, but often find taking such classes difficult because of their already intensive core curricula.

Anne Marie Piper

Assistant Professor, Communication Studies, School of Communication

“Assistive Communication Design: Experiential Learning with Local Community Impact”

Piper's project-based and community-focused course will combine experiential learning with local community impact as students learn to develop technologies that will help those with disabilities more fully take advantage of modern communications such as social media and the Internet, important parts of human interaction many of us take for granted.

“The learning experience comes together through a quarter-long communication design project that matches teams of students with local organizations serving people with disabilities,” Piper said. “I envision students working on projects that increase access to online health information, provide remote therapy for people in rural areas or who are unable to leave their homes, and design new games for children with speech or language delays.”

Funds from the award will help Piper bring in leading experts in vision loss, aging and developmental disabilities to work with students and give them feedback on their projects.

Back to top