Sanctions and Outcomes

Overview of Sanctions, Outcomes & Interventions

Students, groups of students, or student organizations found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct (or any other University rules, regulations, or policies) shall be subject to a variety of sanctions, outcomes, and interventions. These include disciplinary sanctions, housing sanctions, educational and developmental requirements, corrective and restorative outcomes, and other interventions and referrals. Sanctions and outcomes may be imposed alone or in combination and may also include any condition that must be fulfilled in lieu of an alternative or additional sanction.

Some of the most common sanctions, outcomes, and interventions are listed below, but these lists do not exclude other appropriate sanctions or requirements. Failure to comply with sanctions or other requirements may result in additional charges or violations or in holds being placed on student accounts (including registration, graduation, and transcript holds).

Factors Considered in Sanctioning

When considering the sanctions or outcomes to be imposed, a range of factors may be considered, including

  • the nature and severity of the incident
  • the disciplinary history of the student
  • the developmental needs of the student
  • the level of accountability and responsibility taken by the student
  • the level of cooperation from the student
  • the need to stop the misconduct and prevent its recurrence;
  • the need to remedy or address the impact or effects of the conduct on others;
  • the impact on and interests of the community;
  • any other aggravating, mitigating or relevant factors

A student’s use of alcohol or other drugs prior to or in connection with an incident — even if lawfully consumed — will generally be viewed as an aggravating factor. Other aggravating factors, especially for incidents that involve alcohol, include participation in drinking games or other excessive, abusive, or irresponsible patterns of consumption (e.g., chugging, funneling, keg stands).

Disciplinary Sanctions

Disciplinary sanctions include the following:

  1. Exclusion: A status in which students are deprived of all attributes of student status and may not register, submit written course work, receive academic credit, attend classes, remain in University housing, or participate in any function or event sponsored by the University or any of its departments, groups, or organizations (unless specifically authorized). A student who is excluded may not reenter the University without acceptance of formal application by the Office of Admission and approval of the vice president for student affairs (and completion of any other requirements that may have been imposed for re-entry).
  2. Suspension: A status, imposed for a minimum of one academic quarter and a maximum of two years, in which students are removed from the University and may not register, attend classes, submit course work, receive academic credit, remain in University housing, or participate in any function or event sponsored by the University or any of its departments, groups, or organizations (unless specifically authorized). Suspension may also include the impositions of conditions for re-enrollment or reapplication.
  3. Deferred Suspension: A status, imposed in response to repeated acts of misconduct or to incidents that may be serious enough to merit suspension but where specific mitigating factors exist, in which a student is given a specific period of time to demonstrate the ability to abide by the community standards and expectations or face an immediate suspension of a designated period of time. Suspensions may also be deferred pending adherence to or completion of specific additional conditions or requirements. If a student on deferred suspension is found in violation of any act of misconduct (or otherwise fails to comply with specified conditions or requirements), the originally defined suspension takes effect immediately without further review. Additional student conduct sanctions appropriate to any new act of misconduct may also be taken.
  4. Disciplinary Probation: A status, imposed for a specific period of time, to allow students to reflect upon their choices and behavior and to demonstrate the ability to abide by community standards and expectations. Any indicating that any violations committed during the period of probation may result in more serious sanctions, including suspension for a minimum of one academic quarter.
  5. Social Probation: A status, imposed for a specific period of time, in which students or student organizations are barred from or limited in engaging in, participating in, hosting, or sponsoring social events (formal or informal) or other non-academic activities. The purpose of social probation is to allow students to reflect on creating and sustaining socially responsible environments and behaviors and to demonstrate the ability to abide by community standards and expectations. The precise parameters of social probation may vary depending on the circumstances and will be specified in writing.
  6. Warning: Formal notice that a student’s actions violated a University rule or policy, that such actions are no acceptable in our community, and that further misconduct, or any other violation of a University rule or policy, may result in more serious disciplinary action. Students are thus expected to reflect upon their decisions and to be mindful of how their future choices and actions may impact themselves, others and the University community.
  7. Fines: Monetary penalties imposed for violations.
  8. Loss or Restriction of Privileges or Activities: The withdrawal of the use of services or privileges as a student or member of the community, or the loss of the privilege to participate in an activity or event

Exclusions and suspensions (including deferred suspensions) may be imposed as part of an administrative resolution only if students voluntarily agree in writing to the imposition of that sanction and to waive their right to an appeal or review; otherwise, such sanctions may only be imposed through the University Hearing and Appeals System (UHAS), the Sexual Assault Hearing and Appeals System (SAHAS), or other designated resolution procedure.

Housing Sanctions

Housing sanctions may be imposed in conjunction with violations of residence hall rules and regulations, violations related to University housing facilities (including fraternity and sorority houses), or as otherwise appropriate. Housing sanctions include the following:

  1. Housing Removal: Removal from residence halls, residential colleges, and fraternity/sorority houses for a certain period of time or permanently.
  2. Housing Relocation: Requiring a student to transfer to a different residential facility or housing unit.
  3. Housing Probation: A status, imposed for a specific period of time, to allow students to reflect upon their choices and behavior and to demonstrate the ability to abide by community standards and expectations. Any violation that occurs while on this status may result in a sanction of not less than relocation or removal from a residential facility or fraternity/sorority house.

Additional Outcomes & Interventions

Other outcomes and interventions of an educational, developmental, restorative, supportive, and sustaining nature that may be imposed in conjunction with disciplinary or housing sanctions include the following:

  1. Educational Requirements: Participation or completion of a project, class, or other activity to build awareness or knowledge relevant to the nature of the offense or oneself, including research papers, personal reflections, workshops, organizing a “fireside,” designing an informational bulletin board, or preparing an action plan.
  2. University or Community Service: Completion of a project or period of service to the University (or one of its departments or divisions) or with an organization providing services to the community.
  3. Referrals to Other Offices, Departments, Programs or Agencies: Attendance at and completion of any assessment, program, treatment plan, or intervention to which a student is referred. This includes referrals to Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Health Services, alcohol or drug assessments and/or programs, community service agencies, and other University offices.
  4. Restrictions on Access or Contact: Restrictions or prohibitions on a student’s entry or access to particular locations, premises, or events, or on a students’ contact with another student or group of students.
  5. Restitution or Replacement: Requiring a student to replace damaged property or pay for damages or costs caused by the student’s misconduct.
  6. Restorative Actions: Requiring a student to engage in actions to restore the impact of a violation and repair the harms resulting from misconduct on other members of the community. These actions may include letters of apology, drafting and implementing a plan of resolution, engaging in restorative justice conferences, and developing plans for reintegration.