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Annual Events

Trans Day of Remembrance

(From the organization Transgender Day of Remembrance)

The Transgender Day of Remembrance is recognized annually each November 20. It is a day to memorialize fallen members of the trans* community who have been killed as a result of transphobia and hate.

The Transgender Day of Remembrance was set aside to memorialize those who were killed due to anti-transgender hatred or prejudice. The event is held in November to honor Rita Hester, whose murder on November 28th, 1998 kicked off the “Remembering Our Dead” web project and a San Francisco candlelight vigil in 1999. Rita Hester’s murder — like most anti-transgender murder cases — has yet to be solved.

The Transgender Day of Remembrance serves raises public awareness of hate crimes against transgender people, an action that current media doesn’t perform. Day of Remembrance publicly mourns and honors the lives of our brothers and sisters who might otherwise be forgotten.

Through the vigil, we express love and respect for our people in the face of national indifference and hatred. Day of Remembrance reminds non-transgender people that we are their sons, daughters, parents, friends and lovers. Day of Remembrance gives our allies a chance to step forward with us and stand in vigil, memorializing those of us who’ve died by anti-transgender violence.

Multicultural Student Affairs and Rainbow Alliance host this annual event honoring trans lives in November. Past events have honors trans lives lost through a reading of the names of those that have been killed, collective and public art projects, and the reading of poetry. 
 

National Coming Out Day

(From the Human Rights Campaign Website)
On Oct. 11, 1987, half a million people participated in the March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights. It was the second such demonstration in our nation’s capital and resulted in the founding of a number of LGBTQ organizations, including the National Latino/a Gay & Lesbian Organization (LLEGÓ) and AT&T’s LGBTQ employee group, LEAGUE. 
The momentum continued four months after this extraordinary march as more than 100 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer activists from around the country gathered in Manassas, Va., about 25 miles outside Washington, D.C. Recognizing that the LGBTQ community often reacted defensively to anti-LGBTQ actions, they came up with the idea of a national day to celebrate coming out and chose the anniversary of that second march on Washington to mark it. The originators of the idea were Rob Eichberg, a founder of the personal growth workshop, The Experience, and Jean O'Leary, then head of National Gay Rights Advocates. From this idea the National Coming Out Day was born.
Multicultural Student Affairs and Rainbow Alliance host an annual event celebrating National Coming Out Day on, or near, October 11th, in order to continue to promote a safe world for LGBTQIA+ individuals to live truthfully and openly. We gather students, staff, and faculty to share their experiences and stories around being out as LGBTQIA+ on campus and for attendees to engage in dialogue and discussion with the Queer community on campus. 

Dia de los Muertos / Day of the Dead

Dia de los Muertos is an annual holiday to honor and celebrate the lives of deceased loved ones. Multicultural Student Affairs and Alianza annually observe this traditional holiday by inviting everyone to come to the Multicultural Center to build an altar. 
Students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to place items and images of loved ones on the altar, as the community honors departed family members or friends. The altar will then be on display for the first week in November. Past events to celebrate the holiday have also included food, hot chocolate, music, and sugar skull painting.

Indigenous Peoples' Day

In 2016, Mayor Elizabeth Tishdahl issued an official proclamation to support of the creation of Indigenous Peoples' Day in Evanston, Illinois. MSA will observe Indigenous Peoples' Day on the second Monday of October.

In association with campus partners, MSA will host activities and events that celebrate and honor the many Indigenous, Native, and First Nation peoples from across the country and the world. The Northwestern campus sits on the traditional homelands of the Council of Three Fires Nations, which includes the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi.

It is within Northwestern's responsibility as an academic institution to disseminate knowledge about Native peoples and the institution's history with them. 

Native American and Indigenous Community Dinner

The Native American and Indigenous Community dinner is our annual Spring event to gather in community to share and recognize the yearly contributions of Native and Indigenous students, faculty, staff, and community members whom ensure Northwestern University is a welcoming and inclusive place for Native and Indigenous Peoples. 

 

American Indian Day

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In Illinois, the fourth Friday of September, is designated American Indian Day. The Northwestern campus sits on Native the traditional homelands of the Council of Three Fires Nations, which includes the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi.

It is within Northwestern's responsibility as an academic institution to disseminate knowledge about Native peoples and the institution's history with them. In association with campus partners, MSA will co-host events that honor and celebrate the long-standing and continuous contribution of Native Peoples to our society. 

Queer Prom

Queer Prom is an evening of dancing, fun, and a celebration of self in an affirming space that honors need for a prom without the high expectations and anxiety of a high school prom. MSA in collaboration with Rainbow Alliance hosts this annual celebration. Dress up, dress down, wear whatever makes you feel good so that you can come an be your true, authentic self. 
 

 

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