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Northwestern University

2016-2017

Huey Copeland

Huey Copeland

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, The Graduate School and Associate Professor, Art History, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

Huey Copeland (Ph.D., History of Art, University of California, Berkeley, 2006) is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in The Graduate School and Associate Professor of Art History with affiliations in the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program and the Department of African American Studies. His writing—which has been translated into French, German, and Spanish—focuses on modern and contemporary art with an emphasis on articulations of blackness in the Western visual field.

Copeland’s various research interests are reflected by his interdisciplinary course offerings, which range from the graduate seminar “The ‘Global’ 1960s,” to an introductory survey focused on European and American modernisms. Alongside his work as a teacher, critic, scholar, and administrator, he has co-curated exhibitions such as Interstellar Low Ways (with Anthony Elms), co-organized international conferences like “Black Collectivities” (with Naomi Beckwith), and co-edited several journal volumes, including “New World Slavery and the Matter of the Visual” (with Krista Thompson). An alumnus of the 2003 Whitney Independent Study Program and the 2013 Johannesburg Workshop in Theory and Criticism, Copeland has received support from the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center for American Modernism, the Program of African Studies, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University.

Vicky Kalogera

Vicky Kalogera

Erastus O. Haven Professor, Physics and Astronomy and Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

Vicky Kalogera is interested in the physics of compact astrophysical objects: white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. In binary systems, where two stars orbit each other, the interactions of compact objects are especially interesting. They can include a wide variety of violent phenomena such as powerful X-ray emission, supernova explosions, black hole formation, and mergers. Kalogera's research is focused mainly on how such systems are born, how they evolve, and how they end their lives. She is also interested in how the properties of such systems are affected by their galactic environments.

Kalogera studies compact objects in three main contexts: as sources of X-ray emission, radio pulses, and gravitational waves. Her research goals include the understanding of X-ray binary observations with NASA's Chandra Observatory in the Milky Way and other galaxies, of current discoveries of binary pulsar systems, and the prediction of anticipated event rates for current and future gravitational wave detectors.

Kalogera is a member of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration and works on the theoretical understanding of gravitational wave sources and the development of optimal detection methods. She leads the LIGO research team at Northwestern, which contributed to the historic detection of gravitational waves and measurement of black holes through their predictions for anticipated detections, interpreting the astrophysics, analyzing the data and characterizing the detectors.

Rachel Davis Mersey

Rachel Davis Mersey

Associate Professor, Journalism, Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications

Rachel Davis Mersey’s work focuses on the craft of journalism and audience understanding. She is intrigued, in particular, by journalism’s impact on identity, sense of community, and social capital. She believes that these relationships deserve to be understood in a manner that can enhance professional decision-making when it comes to new product development and ongoing news management. Her aim is to improve the practice of journalism in a manner that enhances news operations’ connections with individuals.

Rachel’s research has been published in journals across a variety of disciplines and presented at academic and industry conferences including those for the Paley Center for Media in New York and the American Society of News Editors. Research she presented at the 2007 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication conference was awarded “top paper” by the International Newsmedia Marketing Association (INMA). In addition, she has done work for the Newspaper Association of America on young adults and newspapers, and the Chicago Community Trust on local information needs. Rachel also served as an advisory member to the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy, jointly organized by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Aspen Institute. Her first book, Can Journalism Be Saved? Rediscovering America’s Appetite for News, was published by Praeger in August 2010.

Rachel serves as the Senior Director of Research for the Media Management Center, which is affiliated with the Kellogg School of Management and the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications. In this role, she is responsible for the vision, strategy and oversight of the Center's current and future research. She is also a Fellow at Northwestern University's Institute for Policy Research.
Melissa Simon

Melissa Simon

Vice Chair, Clinical Research and George H. Gardner Professor of Clinical Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Feinberg School of Medicine

Dr. Simon's primary research interests are aimed at eliminating health disparities among low income, medically underserved women across the lifespan. Integrating health services research with social epidemiologic models, Dr. Simon's research focuses on interventions (such as patient navigation and community health outreach workers) that aim to reduce and eliminate such disparities. Within this context, Dr. Simon prefers to leverage culture and community to achieve these goals and thereby integrates community based participatory research framework into her work. Using community-based participatory action approaches to research, training, and education, her work promotes social change that will improve the health of culturally diverse, underserved populations.

James Speta

James Speta

Research Professor and Sr. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and International Initiatives, Pritzker School of Law

Jim Speta has been a member of the faculty since 1999. His research interests include telecommunications and Internet policy, antitrust, administrative law, and market organization. He teaches in the Law School and in the Joint Program in Law and Business operated by the Law School and the Kellogg School. A 1991 graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, Speta joined the Northwestern faculty following a one-year visit. He had previously clerked for Judge Harry T. Edwards on the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and practiced appellate, telecommunications, and antitrust law with the Chicago firm of Sidley & Austin.

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