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Northwestern University

2014-2015

Linda Broadbelt

Linda Broadbelt

Professor and Chair, Chemical and Biological Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science

Linda Broadbelt is the Sarah Rebecca Roland Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering in McCormick. Linda’s research and teaching interests are in the areas of multiscale modeling, complex kinetics modeling, environmental catalysis, novel biochemical pathways, and polymerization/depolymerization kinetics. Her career awards are numerous and include selection as the AIChE Women's Initiative Committee Mentorship Excellence Award winner, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Fulbright Distinguished Scholar Award, a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation, and a McCormick Excellence Award.

She recently served on the Executive Board of the National Program Committee of AIChE and also completed a five-year term as the chair of programming for the Division of Catalysis and Reaction Engineering of AIChE. She was also appointed to the Scientific Organizing Committee for the 21st and19th International Symposium on Chemical Reaction Engineering and served on the Science Advisory Committee of the Gulf Coast Hazardous Substance Research Center from 1998-2005. She received her B.S. in chemical engineering from The Ohio State University and graduated summa cum laude. She completed her Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the University of Delaware in 1994.  She has also completed the short course, Management for Scientists and Engineers, a joint offering through the Kellogg School of Management and the Graduate School.

Edward Gibson

Edward Gibson

Professor and Chair, Political Science, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

Edward Gibson is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science in Weinberg.  His current research focuses on conflicts and dynamics of democratization in Latin America and the United States.  Previous work has addressed the politics of federalism, party politics, and market reform in Latin America.  He has published three books, most recently Boundary Control: Subnational Authoritarianism in Federal Democracies (Cambridge, 2012), which addresses the problem of subnational authoritarianism in national democracies via a comparison of the “Solid South” in 19th and 20th century United States and contemporary Argentina and Mexico. His previous books are Federalism and Democracy in Latin America (Johns Hopkins, 2004) and Class and Conservative Parties: Argentina in Comparative Perspective (Johns Hopkins, 1996).  He has also published articles in edited volumes and journal articles in, among others, World PoliticsComparative Politics, and Studies in Comparative International Development.

Gibson was the first political scientist to be awarded a Faculty Early Career Development Award (CAREER) by the National Science Foundation.  He has received research support from the Howard Foundation, the Searle Kinship Foundation, and the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies.  He has also won numerous teaching awards including Northwestern University’s Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, a three-year endowed chair. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Emily Kadens

Emily Kadens

Professor of Law and Faculty Director, Clerkship Program, School of Law

Professor Kadens specializes in pre-modern European legal history. Her current research focuses on the historical problem of how custom functioned as law, the history of bankruptcy, and early modern commercial law. Her article on the history of judicial education in England won the 2010 Sutherland Prize from the American Society of Legal Historians for the best paper in English legal history, and her article on an early eighteenth-century bankruptcy scam won the 2011 Editors' Prize from the American Bankruptcy Law Journal.  In 2012, Kadens was a Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress doing research on medieval theories of custom and for the Spring Semester of 2013 she received the Richard & Diane Cummins Legal History Research Grant at George Washington University Law School.  She teaches contracts, sales, Roman law, and legal history.

Prior to joining the Northwestern faculty in 2013, Kadens taught at the University of Texas at Austin, where she was the Baker and Botts Professor in Law.  She completed her B.A. and M.A. at the University of Chicago, her M.A. and Ph.D. in History at Princeton University, and her J.D. with honors at the University of Chicago Law School.  She also clerked for the Honorable Danny J. Boggs, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

Susan Phillips

Susan Phillips

Associate Professor and Associate Chair, English, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

A medievalist with Early Modern leanings, Professor Susie Phillips teaches courses on late medieval and Early Modern literature and culture, drama, Shakespeare, and Chaucer. In her scholarship as well as her teaching, she is interested in the materiality of the book—how texts were produced, published, circulated, and read. Her book, Transforming Talk: The Problem with Gossip in Late Medieval England(Penn State 2007) explores the religious, cultural, and literary work of "idle talk" in late medieval England. Phillips’s current project, Polyglots and Pocketbooks, investigates early European popular pedagogy by tracing the cultural history of the multilingual dictionaries, phrasebooks, and guides to conversation that flooded the early modern marketplace, offering language lessons outside classroom to an ever-expanding audience.

Professor Phillips is a recent recipient of the Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professorship, the Weinberg College of Arts and Science Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities Fellowship.  She completed her M.A. and Ph.D. at Harvard University.

Miriam Sherin

Miriam Sherin

Professor, Learning Sciences and Director of Undergraduate Education, School of Education and Social Policy

Miriam Gamoran Sherin's research interests include mathematics teaching and learning, teacher cognition and the role of video in teacher learning. Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing through Teachers' Eyes, edited by Sherin, V. Jacobs, and R. Philipp, received the AERA Division K 2013 Excellence in Research in Teaching and Teacher Education award. Recent articles appear in Journal of Teacher Education, Teaching and Teacher Education and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. In 1996 Sherin received a postdoctoral fellowship from the James S. McDonnell Foundation to examine the demands that mathematics reform places on teachers' knowledge. In 2001 she received a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Academy of Education and the Spencer Foundation to examine how video clubs can support the development of teachers' professional vision. Sherin was also awarded a five-year Early Career Grant from the National Science Foundation to study the ways that video can support teacher learning. In April 2003, Sherin received the Kappa Delta Pi/American Educational Research Association Division K Award for early career achievements in research on teaching and teacher education.
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