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Chicago Humanities Festival Evanston Day Oct. 16

Events include interview, reading, lectures, demonstration and cabaret performance

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September 19, 2011 | by Judy Moore

EVANSTON, Ill. --- The Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF) will launch its activities this year with the celebration of Evanston Day Sunday, Oct. 16 on Northwestern University’s Evanston campus.

The day’s events begin at noon and conclude at 8:15 p.m. at four Evanston campus locations.
Speakers and participants will include Northwestern faculty members Bill Savage, Ken Alder, S. Hollis Clayson, Noshir Contractor and Dominic Missimi, along with nationally known guests and cover topics from the arts, history and literature to philosophy, public affairs and science and technology.

“It’s our first full Evanston day,” said Jara Kern, director of marketing and communications for the Chicago Humanities Festival. “Seven of the 83 festival events will take place at Northwestern. A Festival Day in Hyde Park Oct. 23 will be held on the University of Chicago campus. The remaining events will take place from Nov. 2 to 13 at other Chicago locations.”

Festival Day in Evanston is presented in partnership with Northwestern’s Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities.

CHF members may purchase Evanston Day passes for $45 each which grant holders access to all Oct. 16 festival events. Already on sale, passes must be purchased in advance either online or by phone and are redeemed for tickets at each event. (CHF membership begins at $100.)

Ticket holders, day pass holders and Red Badge members (donors and CHF members who have contributed a gift of $2,500 or more) without advance reservations are guaranteed admission up to 10 minutes prior to programs’ start time. Unclaimed seats may be reassigned.

For tickets or day passes, phone the CHF box office at (312) 494-9509. Full price tickets cost $5 more at the door. There is no door surcharge for student and teacher tickets. For more on these and other festival events visit www.chicagohumanities.org.

The hourlong Oct. 16 Northwestern Evanston campus events include:

Noon, on-stage interview, “Technology’s Tomorrow: Sci-Fi with William Gibson” at the Ethel M. Barber Theater, 30 Arts Circle Drive. American-Canadian speculative fiction novelist William Ford Gibson will be interviewed by Bill Savage, senior lecturer in English in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award in Literary Criticism. Gibson, who has been called the “noir prophet” of the cyberpunk subgenre for coining the term “cyberspace,” and popularizing the concept in his 1984 debut novel, “Neuromancer,” will discuss his work and the future of science fiction. Presented in partnership with the Theatre and Interpretation Center at Northwestern University. General admission is $10 and free for teachers and students with valid IDs.

1:30 p.m. - “Don’t Let Me Be Lonely: Reading with Claudia Rankine” at Harris Hall, Room 107, 1881 Sheridan Road. Award-winning poet Claudia Rankine will discuss and read from her new work -- a multi-genre project that blends poetry, essays and image in an experimental and personal exploration of the condition of fragmented selfhood in contemporary America. General admission is $5 and free for teachers and students with valid IDs.

1:30 p.m. lecture - “The Truth Machine: American Justice and Our Obsession with Lie Detection” at McCormick Auditorium at Norris University Center, 1999 Campus Drive. Ken Alder, professor of history and Milton H. Wilson Professor in the Humanities in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, will recount the history of the lie detector and its effect on American justice and the fraught relationship between science and law in 20th-centuryAmerica. General admission is $5 and free for teachers and students with valid IDs.

3:30 p.m. lecture - “Shedding Artificial Light on Art History,” at Harris Hall, Room 107. Art historian S. Hollis Clayson, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences’ Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities and director of Northwestern’s Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, will tell the tale of Thomas Edison’s introduction of the incandescent light bulb in Paris in 1881. General admission is $5 and free for teachers and students with valid IDs.

3:30 p.m. lecture - “Traces in a Tangled Web,” at McCormick Auditorium, Norris University Center. Noshir Contractor, Jane S. and William J. White Professor of Behavioral Sciences in the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, School of Communication and Kellogg School of Management, will illuminate the global role Internet science plays in helping us understand our networks and what those networks tell us about the human experience. General admission is $5 and free for teachers and students with valid IDs.

5 p.m. demonstration - “The Human Voice on Stage: Amped Up or Unplugged,” at the Ethel M. Barber Theater. Director Dominic Missimi, professor emeritus in service and executive director of the American Music Theatre Project at Northwestern; sound designer Joshua Horvath and music director Ryan Nelson -- the creative team behind Northwestern’s fall 2011 production of the hit musical “Rent” -- will share the techniques and tools singers use to manipulate their natural voices. General admission is $10 and free for teachers and students with valid IDs. This program is generously underwritten by Sonia Marschak and presented in partnership with the Theatre and Interpretation Center at Northwestern University.

7 p.m. - The Helen B. and Ira E. Graham Family ASCAP Cabaret: “Perfect Hermany – The Songs of Jerry Herman,” at Cahn Auditorium, 600 Emerson St. This year’s cabaret celebrates award-winning Broadway composer and lyricist Herman. Jason Graae will pay homage to Herman by singing selections from classic musicals, including “Hello Dolly,” “Mame,” “La Cage aux Folles” and “The Grand Tour.” Graae has starred on and off Broadway, toured the country alongside Herman singing in “Hello, Jerry!” and recorded more than 40 compact discs, including two solo albums. General admission is $20 and $5 for teachers and students with valid IDs.

The Chicago Humanities Festival’s mission is to create opportunities for people of all ages to support, enjoy and explore the humanities through the organization’s annual festivals and programs presented throughout the year that encourage the study and enjoyment of the humanities.

Topics: Campus Life