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Two Weinberg Faculty Named Guggenheim Fellows

Erkkila and Fine recognized for exceptional scholarship

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April 23, 2010

Betsy Erkkila
Betsy Erkkila

Gary Alan Fine
Gary Alan Fine

EVANSTON, Ill. --- Betsy Erkkila and Gary Alan Fine, professors in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University, have been named Guggenheim Fellows by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Guggenheim Fellowships recognize demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. Out of as many as 4,000 applicants, approximately 220 fellows are named each year. The program helps provide blocks of time for fellows to work with as much creative freedom as possible.

Erkkila, the Henry Sanborn Noyes Professor of Literature at Northwestern, researches in the field of American literary and cultural studies. She is particularly interested in American poetry, comparative American cultures, race and gender studies, and cultural and political theory. She is the author or editor of six books, including "Mixed Bloods and Other American Crosses: Rethinking American Literature from the Revolution to the Culture Wars," published in 2005. She also has published a number of essays and articles on American literature.

Erkkila previously was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Humanities Center, the American Council for Learned Societies and the Fulbright Foundation.

Fine, John Evans Professor of Sociology at Northwestern, is a social psychologist who specializes in the sociology of culture, ethnographic research, social theory and collective behavior. In June his new book, "The Global Grapevine: Why Rumors of Terrorism, Immigration and Trade Matter," will be published by Oxford University Press. Currently he is studying the development of reputations, the multiple social worlds of chess, the sociology of humor and joking, and the role of small group cultures in civil society. He is the author or co-author of nearly 20 books, including his most recent work, "Authors of the Storm: Meteorology and the Culture of Prediction" (the recipient of the Charles Horton Cooley Award of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction).

Fine previously was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Bellagio Center of the Rockefeller Foundation. Fine was the recipient of the George Herbert Mead Award for Lifetime Contributions from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction. He is currently serving as editor of Social Psychology Quarterly, the microsociology journal of the American Sociological Association.

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