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Alex Kotlowitz to Read From His Works at Northwestern

Best-selling writer known for his work on race, poverty and children

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December 28, 2009 | by Wendy Leopold
EVANSTON, Ill. --- Writer Alex Kotlowitz, best known as the author of the national bestseller "There Are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in the Other America," will read from his works Tuesday, Jan. 26, at Northwestern University.

His first book, "There Are No Children Here" was selected by the New York Public Library as one of the 150 most important books of the 20th century.

Kotlowitz's reading will take from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in Hagstrum Room 201 of University Hall, 1897 Sheridan Road, on the University's Evanston campus. It is free and open to the public.

Kotlowitz also is author of "The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death and America's Dilemma," a book about the racially charged death of a Michigan teenager, and of "Never a City So Real," an ode to Chicago and Chicagoans.

"There Are No Children Here" traced the lives of brothers growing up in a Chicago housing project and brought national attention to the dire conditions in which inner city children live. It has sold more than a half million copies and been translated into numerous languages.

Between books, Kotlowitz has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker and public radio show "This American Life." He has received a Peabody Award for his work in radio and, among other honors, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, the George Polk Award, the Carl Sandburg Literary Award and the Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism.

At Northwestern, he teaches at the Medill School of Journalism and at the Center for the Writing Arts. The event, titled "Alex Kotlowitz Reads from Various Works," is sponsored by the Center for the Writing Arts.

For information about the reading or Center for the Writing Arts, call (847) 467-4099, e-mail words@northwestern.edu or visit http://www.northwestern.edu/writing-arts/index.html.