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Northwestern Black History Month Events Open to Public

Northwestern's Black History Month celebration includes a cultural show, lectures, discussions, film screenings, a theatrical production and a seminar series.

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February 10, 2009 | by Judy Moore
EVANSTON, Ill. --- Northwestern University's Black History Month celebration that began in early February and continues through mid-March includes a cultural show, lectures, discussions, film screenings, a theatrical production and a seminar series.

Below are highlights of some of the Evanston campus events that are free and open to the public.

• African Student Association Cultural Show, 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, will be held in Norris University Center's McCormick Auditorium, 1999 Campus Drive. This year's show will follow the theme of "Courting our Heritage" and will explore different parts of everyday life in Africa as well as showcase how culture is maintained in a contemporary world. The program will include African fashion, music and performance. Free tickets will be available at the door on the night of the event. The show will be followed by a 7 p.m. reception at the Dittmar Memorial Gallery in Norris Center.

• A discussion of the Martin Luther King Jr. "I Have a Dream" speech and Barack Obama's speech on race, which he delivered in Philadelphia in March 2008, will be held at 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16, in Walter Annenberg Hall, Room 347, 2120 Campus Drive. The two-hour discussion will focus on the meaning of these texts and will be led by experienced co-leaders who are busily preparing for the event. The group will be no larger than 15 people. For those who are interested in participating in the discussion, contact Professor Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon, director of the Master of Science in Education Program, at (847) 467-1999 or shg@northwestern.edu. Light refreshments will be served.

• A discussion on "What Is Your History?" at noon, Tuesday, Feb. 17, will be held in the Wildcat Room, Norris University Center, 1999 Campus Drive. The event is sponsored by African American Student Affairs, Louis and Saeree Fiedler Hillel Center and Multicultural Student Affairs.

• "The New Biopolitics of Race, Health Inequities & Racial Equality" program at noon Thursday, Feb. 24, will be held at African American Student Affairs, 1914 Sheridan Road. It will be presented by the Northwestern University School of Law's Dorothy E. Roberts, Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law.

• Valerie Goodloe, the National Association of Black Journalists' winter speaker, will talk at 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 24, McCormick Tribune Center, 1870 Campus Drive. Goodloe, an award-winning West Coast staff photojournalist for Ebony and Jet magazines, will show photos of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama that she took during the recent Presidential campaign. Goodloe's program will be immediately followed by a reception in the atrium outside of McCormick Tribune Auditorium. Goodloe's appearance is co-sponsored by the National Association of Black Journalists and Medill School of Journalism.

• "The Promise of Citizenship: Implications and Issues in the 21st Century" lecture at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 26, will be held at African American Student Affairs, 1914 Sheridan Road. It will be presented by African American Student Affairs Winter Speaker Marcia G. Cooke, Federal Judge, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida. The lecture is co-sponsored by African American Student Affairs and PURSUIT, a student organization.

• Northwestern's African American Studies Winter 2009 Departmental Seminar Series has scheduled a series of Tuesday afternoon lectures that will be held from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. Remaining lectures include: Feb. 17, Lisa Calvente, "'Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child': Performing Homespace, Combating Racism Within Everyday Life"; Feb. 24, Sherwin Bryant, "Guayaquil: On the Margins of the Atlantic World, or At the Nexus of an Emergent Black Pacific?"; March 3, Tracy Vaughn "(W)rites of Passing: Passing and the Performance of Identity in Charles Chestnutt's 'The House Behind the Cedars'"; and March 10, Nitasha Sharma, "The Politics of Multiraciality: A Comparative Study of Biracials in the U.S. and Trinidad." For more information, visit http://www.afam.northwestern.edu.

For Evanston campus event details and updates, visit the African American Student Affairs Black History Month online calendar at: http://www.northwestern.edu/assa/bhm.html.