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Northwestern University in Qatar Hosts Students at Reception

Northwestern University in Qatar welcomed its first accepted students at a reception and video conference in its new space in the TAMU-Q building in Education City.

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April 15, 2008
DOHA, Qatar --- Northwestern University in Qatar (NU-Q) welcomed its first accepted students at a reception and video conference on Sunday (April 13) in its new space in the TAMU-Q building in Education City.

Students accepted for the first classes that will start in August were invited to attend the event with their parents and families.

The event was attended by NU-Q and Qatar Foundation officials, including John Margolis, dean; Susan Dun, associate dean for admissions and student affairs; Robert Ferrin, director of admission; Denny Roberts, assistant vice president for education, faculty and student services, Qatar Foundation. Other officials from Northwestern's Evanston and Qatar campuses and from the Qatar Foundation also attended.

The reception allowed the students an opportunity to meet the dean and senior staff to ask questions and to talk via video conference with students and faculty from the Evanston campus where they are currently in spring quarter classes.

"We are extremely pleased to welcome this outstanding group of students to NU-Q as members of our inaugural class," Susan Dun said. "Their records of accomplishment are impressive."

Northwestern University in Qatar is one of six colleges established by the Qatar Foundation in Education City, Doha.

Programs offered at NU-Qatar will offer the same curriculum and will be taught by the same faculty in its internationally renowned Medill School of Journalism and School of Communication.

The Medill School at Northwestern is a top-ranked program offering undergraduate study in newspaper and broadcast media that will culminate in the bachelor of science in journalism.

Northwestern's School of Communication is a top-ranked program offering undergraduate training in telecommunications, radio/television/film, and interactive media that will culminate in the bachelor of science in communication.

The two programs are the first undergraduate degrees offered by Northwestern away from its main campus. Admission requirements to the programs at Education City are the same as at the parent institution, and the degree awarded upon graduation is identical to that earned at the home campus.

Medill's journalism program will teach students how to source and write stories and report and edit across all of the print and digital media platforms. It will also explore journalism ethics, law, and professional practices and instruct students about how to understand and connect with media audiences. Students in the Medill program will have a work experience in a professional journalism setting, such as a newspaper or television station, away from the Doha campus. This component of the program may either be spent in a Northwestern newsroom, or with a professional media company in the US or the Middle East.

The School of Communication's new program in media industries and technology will enable students to develop intellectual and communication skills and study, in depth, communication industries and associated technologies. The program will also offer a cinema and television strand, which will include courses in screenwriting, editing, lighting, cinematography and directing, as well as the history of film and broadcasting. In addition, a computer-mediated communication curriculum will offer courses in designing for the Internet, interactive media and computer animation, as well as options to study online communities and the Internet and society. Each student in the program will be required to complete an internship in an appropriate field and write a senior thesis.
Topics: University