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SEC Chairman Cox to Speak at Law School

Chairman Christopher Cox, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), will speak at 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 22, at Northwestern University School of Law, 357 E. Chicago Ave.

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January 9, 2007 | by Pat Vaughan Tremmel

CHICAGO --- Chairman Christopher Cox, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), will speak at 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 22,  at Northwestern University School of Law, 357 E. Chicago Ave.

Presented by the Brodsky Family Northwestern JD-MBA Fund, the lecture is free and open to the public. (William J. Brodsky and his wife, Joan, established the Brodsky JD-MBA Fund in 2001 to honor their children who received graduate degrees from Northwestern.)

Cox was confirmed as SEC chairman in August 2005. During his short tenure at the SEC, he has assumed leadership of the global effort to provide investors with interactive data about companies and mutual funds; he has reinvigorated the agency's initiative to provide investor information in plain English; and he has championed efforts to closely integrate U.S. and overseas regulation in an era of global capital markets.

Prior to joining the SEC, Cox was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, where he served for 10 years in the majority leadership as chairman of the House Policy Committee. During his 17-year tenure in Congress, he also served as chairman of the Committee on Homeland Security, of the Select Committee on U.S. National Security, of the Select Committee on Homeland Security, of the Task Force on Capital Markets and of the Task Force on Budget Process Reform.

From 1986 until 1988, Cox served in the White House as senior associate counsel to the president. Prior to that, Cox specialized in venture capital and corporate finance with the international law firm of Latham & Watkins.

In 1977 Cox simultaneously earned an MBA from Harvard Business School and a JD from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Southern California.

The Brodsky JD-MBA Fund supports Northwestern's three-year joint JD-MBA program, one of the most integrated of its kind with one application process and a complementary course of study at Northwestern University School of Law and the Kellogg School of Management.