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Mary Zimmerman to Direct "Cymbeline" at Northwestern

Mary Zimmerman will return to the Northwestern stage this winter for the first time since 1996 to direct William Shakespeare's comedy “Cymbeline.”

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January 30, 2007 | by Judy Moore

EVANSTON, Ill. --- Mary Zimmerman, renowned Tony Award-winning director, Goodman Theatre Artistic Associate, Lookingglass Theatre ensemble member and Northwestern University faculty member, will return to the Northwestern stage this winter for the first time since the 1996 production of “Six Myths” (which became “Metamorphoses” on Broadway) to direct William Shakespeare's comedy “Cymbeline.”

Northwestern University's production of “Cymbeline” will be presented on the Evanston campus at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 9; 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 10; 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 11; 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 14; 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15; 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16; 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17; and 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18, at the Ethel M. Barber Theatre, 30 Arts Circle Drive.

This adventurous Shakespearean fantasy weaves a tale about the beautiful Princess Imogen and her new husband Posthumus, who are parted by circumstances involving her wicked stepmother and her distant father, King Cymbeline. Disguises, misidentifications, plot twists and romantic comedy abound in this ode to the fairy tale world.

Zimmerman, professor of performance studies at Northwestern, said she is attracted to Shakespearean plays that have odd elements in them. “In this case there is a vision of Jupiter. I also think Imogen is a fantastic heroine and I love the traditional fairy tale aspects of the show. I don't think this play is done very often because when you look at the (Shakespearean) canon (the works ascribed to an author that are accepted as genuine), it's not one of the popular titles that jump out at you. But it is very representational of the better known plays because it features romance, sorrow and humor.”

The production will feature a student cast and a dynamic set that Zimmerman describes as a “highly ornate, extremely man-made looking piece of architecture, that's set down in a pile of leaves and cedar chips.” The stage also will be raked “stage right” to “stage left” (rather than upstage to down stage) creating a look that Zimmerman has never seen on a stage before.

Single tickets are priced from $25 for the general public; $22 for senior citizens and Northwestern faculty and staff; and $10 for students.

For more information or to order single or group tickets by phone, call the Theatre and Interpretation Center Box Office at (847) 491-7282.

Online ticket sales for Mainstage productions also are available through TicketWeb.com by going to Northwestern's Theatre and Interpretation Center Web site at http://www.tic.northwestern.edu/tickets.html and clicking the TicketWeb icon.

Topics: Campus Life