Native American Heritage Month

native american community at northwestern celebrating

native american dinner

newberry art

The NU community highlights Native American and Indigenous culture through a variety of events, including guest speakers, panel discussions, films, social gatherings, theatrical performances and literary forums, just to name a few. Native American Heritage Month takes place during the month of November. 

Below is a list of upcoming Events for Native American Heritage Month

2017 Events

NOV 1 | Cultural Survival and Land Dispossession: A Photographic Essay on The Sioux and the Embera Peoples of North and South 

5-6:30 PM, LOCATION TBA

The Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program and the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR) are proud to host Alexandra McNichols-Torroledo, a Colombian-American photographer, to present her work titled, "Cultural Survival and Land Dispossession: A Photographic Essay on The Sioux and the Embera Peoples of North and South America".

NOV 2 | First Nations Film & Video Festival

6-7:30 PM, MITCHELL MUSEUM'S STANLEY GOLDER LIBRARY

First Nations Film & Video Festival, Inc. is a grassroots Native American film festival that showcases works produced by Native American filmmakers and artists of all skill levels. 

NOV 3 | YoNasDa Lonewolf 

Black and Oglala Lakota

2-3:30 PM, GREAT ROOM, 610 Haven Street, Evanston, IL 60201

Human Rights Activist | National Organizer Public Speaker Rap Artist Published Writer

Sponsored by: Multicultural Student Affairs, Office of Institutional Diversity & Inclusion and CPS American Indian Education Program

NOV 10 | Annual Montezuma Lecture

6:30 PM, MITCHELL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN, 3001 CENTRAL STREET

This year ’s Montezuma Lecture will honor Jane Mt. Pleasant who will be speaking on "Sustainable Food and Agriculture Systems: Lessons from an Indigenous Agriculture".

  • Reception to follow at 3009 Central Street
  • Museum members: $12 | Non-members: $15

NOV 15 | An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe

5:30-6:30 PM, HARRIS HALL 108

Between 1846 and 1873, California’s Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley uncovers the full meaning of the slaughter.

NOV 16 | Heid E. Erdrich Reading: Curator of Ephemera at the New Museum for Archaic Media

12:30-3:00 PM, KRESGE HALL #1515

Heid E. Erdrich is a poet, writer, and filmmaker. She is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Curator of Ephemera at the New Museum for Archaic Media and Original Local: Indigenous Foods, Stories, and Recipes from the Upper Midwest, which was a City Pages Top Ten food book for 2014. Heid has curate many exhibits of contemporary Native American art since 2007. Her collaborative poem films have been selected for screening at festivals internationally including ImagineNative, Native Film Festival, Vision Maker, and at the Santa Fe Indian Market film festival, Class-X. These poem videos have won Best of Fest, and a Best Experimental Short awards in 2014 and 2015. Heid grew up in Wahpeton, North Dakota and is Ojibwe enrolled at Turtle Mountain. She teaches the MFA Creative Writing low-residency program of Augsburg College. This reading is co-presented by Northwestern's Poetry and Poetics Colloquium. Heid E. Erdrich is a Fall 2017 Artist in Residence of Northwestern's Center for Native American and Indigenous Research and the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities. Co-presenters of the residency are the New England Foundation for the Arts, Mellon Dance Studies, the Department of Performance Studies, Program in American Studies, the Center for Writing Arts, and the Department of English.

NOV 16 | More than Mascots! Less than Citizens? American Indians Talk: Why Isn’t the US Listening?

4:30-5:30 PM, ANNENBERG HALL, ROOM 303

K. Tsianina Lomawaima uses debates over the name of the American football team “The Washington Redskins” to explore why willful ignorance about American Indian realities are deeply entrenched and passionately defended.

NOV 18 | Sand Creek Massacre Commemoration

12:00 - 2:00 PM, SCOTT HALL, GUILD LOUNGE

Join the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) in a gathering honoring the Cheyenne and Arapaho lives lost on November 29th, 1864. This is an MSA signature event.

NOV 29 | 153rd Anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre

View a moving video of a Dittmar Gallery exhibit from 2015 entitled "One November Morning" that commemorated the Sand Creek Massacre.

NOV 29 | Indigenous Artists in Collaboration: A Conversation

4:30 - 6:00 PM, BLOCK MUSEUM

Join the Block Museum for a conversation with four contemporary Native women artists exploring collaborative practices that unite artists, community, and audience. From to participatory dance and collective narratives, to asynchronous poetry and public interventions each artist’s work upends the notion of art as a singular and finite production. Panelists include Rosy Simas (Seneca, choreographer, and performer), Heid Erdrich (Turtle Mountain Chippewa, poet, writer and filmmaker), Andrea Carlson (Anishinaabe, visual artist), and Debra Yepa-Pappan (Jemez, digital multimedia).The artists will be joined in conversation by Northwestern’s Janet Dees, Steven and Lisa Munster Tananbaum Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and Kelly Wisecup, Associate Professor, Department of English. The discussion will be preceded by a 4PM reception with the artists. Presented in partnership with Northwestern’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research. Image: Skin(s), copyright Rosy Simas  

DEC 1 | Performance by Rosy Simas

7:30 PM - 8:30 PM, BLOCK MUSEUM

Skin(s) shares the beauty and diversity of how Native people identify and examine the contradictions, pride, joy, pain, and sorrow that arise out of our many dimensions of identity. The dance explores what we hold, reveal, and perceive through our skin. Rosy Simas is a Minneapolis-based choreographer and teacher. She is Seneca from the Cattaraugus reservation in New York. Her work addresses how ancestry, homeland, culture, and history are stored in the body and can be expressed through dance. Rosy Simas is a Fall 2017 Artist in Residence of Northwestern's Center for Native American and Indigenous Research and the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities. Co-presenters of the residency are the New England Foundation for the Arts, Mellon Dance Studies, the Department of Performance Studies, Program in American Studies, the Center for Writing Arts, and the Department of English.

DEC 9 | AMERICAN INDIAN CENTER 64TH ANNUAL POW-WOW

10 AM - 5 PM, NORRIS UNIVERSITY CENTER, LOUIS ROOM, 1999 CAMUS DRIVE, EVANSTON, IL 60208

Northwestern will be the host site for the 64th Annual Pow-Wow hosted by the American Indian Center of Chicago.

Free Community Event