SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON FACULTY SALARY AND BENEFITS

On February 5, 2014 the Special Committee on Climate Change and the Anthropocene was established and charged with considering the most effective ways to coordinate and strengthen Northwestern’s effort related to climate change and the Anthropocene.

The committee membership includes representatives from the Educational Affairs, Research, and Social Responsibility committees (membership chosen by the committees themselves) and at least one senior NU administrator. The Senate Chair will serve ex officio.

Though Northwestern has placed global issues at the top of its recent Strategic Plan, established centers for Global Engagement, Global Culture and Communication, and Global Health Studies, developed a Global Opportunities website, hired a new Vice President for Global Marketing, and made global outreach the focus of its recent trustee/faculty luncheon, it has not addressed as an institution global climate change and the anthropocene.  (The latter term, popularized by the atmospheric chemist and Nobel Prize winner Paul Crutzen, describes "a geologic age of our own making" in which natural ecosystems have been so transformed and degraded that they may in the near future be incompatible with human life.) In coordination with existing centers and programs, the new Center  would coordinate research and teaching in the following areas (among others):  the science of climate change; climate policy and national education; ecology and biodiversity; water systems (droughts, floods, and water wars); alternative fuels; transition to more sustainable plant-based diets; soil erosion and depletion; deforestation; species extinction; and  zoonotic diseases.

Upon completion of its evaluation, the committee will write a succinct report and make a recommendation to the Senate.. 

Chair: TBD

MOTION: carried 2/5/2014

Global research and teaching:  The Senate Chair proposes the convening of a Special Faculty Committee -- see Article 5, Section 3, Part 1, to consider the most effective ways to coordinate and strengthen Northwestern’s effort related to climate change and the Anthropocene (actual name to be determined later). The committee will include representatives from the Educational Affairs, Research, and Social Responsibility committees (membership chosen by the committees themselves) and at least one senior NU administrator.  The Senate Chair will serve ex officio. Though Northwestern has placed global issues at the top of its recent Strategic Plan, established centers for Global Engagement, Global Culture and Communication, and Global Health Studies, developed a Global Opportunities website, hired a new Vice President for Global Marketing, and made global outreach the focus of its recent trustee/faculty luncheon, it has not addressed as an institution global climate change and the anthropocene.  (The latter term, popularized by the atmospheric chemist and Nobel Prize winner Paul Crutzen, describes "a geologic age of our own making" in which natural ecosystems have been so transformed and degraded that they may in the near future be incompatible with human life.) In coordination with existing centers and programs, the new Center  would coordinate research and teaching in the following areas (among others):  the science of climate change; climate policy and national education; ecology and biodiversity; water systems (droughts, floods, and water wars); alternative fuels; transition to more sustainable plant-based diets; soil erosion and depletion; deforestation; species extinction; and  zoonotic diseases. Upon completion of its evaluation, the committee will write a succinct report and make a recommendation to the Senate.