Jaclyn Fleck, Psy.D.

Jaclyn Fleck, Psy.D.
Staff Psychologist

Staff Psychologist

Special Interests

Graduate/professional students, traumatic stress, grief/loss, depression, relationship issues, and women’s issues.

Bio

•B.A. in Psychology, Benedictine University, Lisle, IL
•M.A. in Counseling Psychology, Adler School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, IL
•Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology, Adler School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, IL
•Internship: Student Counseling Center, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Knoxville, TN
•Informal Postdoc/Staff Psychologist: Student Counseling Center, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Knoxville, TN

Background

I spent the beginning of my training providing therapy in hospital settings and completing ADHD/LD psychological assessments with children and adolescents. In addition to these settings, I worked part-time in a private practice for four years while completing my doctorate. Though these settings were fulfilling in their own ways, I have found that I feel most at home in university counseling centers. My theoretical orientation is Relational Constructivism and I enjoy using this model to guide my brief individual therapy. I enjoy working with both undergraduate and graduate students; however, I work exclusively at the CAPS Chicago office, which provides services to graduate students.

I am interested in working with various presenting issues and diagnoses and especially enjoy working with clients who exhibit personality disorder characteristics. Further, I have a specialized concentration in Traumatic Stress Psychology and have extensive training working with survivors of various traumas.

I aim to be as congruent as possible in my different roles as psychologist, supervisor, consultant, and colleague and encourage this in my supervisees. My approach to supervision is developmental and collaborative and I strive to provide a safe and supportive environment for my supervisees. I encourage supervisees to take the lead in supervision and come prepared to discuss clinical cases and professional development. My hope is to help psychologists-in-training step outside of their comfort zones and try new interventions in therapy, conceptualize cases in different ways, and be open to feedback.